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Old 02-18-2009, 07:36 PM   #1
Jager71
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Default Is 43,000 miles on a used bike too much?

Hello all,

Newbie question here: I have a local dealer advertising a 2002 Yamaha V star 650. I am looking for a starter bike for myself, and the good news is the listing price is $2800, which seems fair. The bad news is that it has 43,000 miles. Too much to risk, or not something I need to worry as long as it passes an inspection by a mechanic. Any advise would be appreciated.
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Old 02-18-2009, 07:45 PM   #2
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Imo, its not that many miles if,... the rider took care of the bike, completed all the services on time, and didnt abuse the bike. Being a 2002 it must have sat, that can also be bad, for any machine. One good test your trusted technician should perform if the bike looks good and you like it, is a compression test. Those are some of the things you want to know mechaniclly, besides the obvious.
A good thing most overlook when their *****in about the dealership is recourse, that and the fact that they are obligated to make the bike safe at a minimum to beable to sell it.

Next I would make sure thats the out the door price, that includes everything. The Nada book should reveal the retail price which they should be around, remember though its only a guide.Good luck.
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Old 02-19-2009, 06:27 AM   #3
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About 5 years back I sold my '87 Shadow 1100 with 97,000 miles for $2650.
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Old 02-19-2009, 06:38 AM   #4
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Bikes die of neglect, not overuse.

Two years ago, I bought a Concours with 53,000 miles on it for a good price.

10,000 miles later, it's still providing dependable grins.
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Old 02-19-2009, 07:17 AM   #5
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Generally motorcycles hold up pretty well. However specific models sometimes have weak points. You might try searching the net for any sites on the V-Star 650 and see if they are holding up well.

I'd be very interested in meeting anyone dumb enough to give more than $1K for a Shadow 1100 with 97,000 miles on it. I have a '78 IT175 I'd let go for only $2k.
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Old 02-19-2009, 08:02 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seruzawa View Post
Generally motorcycles hold up pretty well. However specific models sometimes have weak points. You might try searching the net for any sites on the V-Star 650 and see if they are holding up well.

I'd be very interested in meeting anyone dumb enough to give more than $1K for a Shadow 1100 with 97,000 miles on it. I have a '78 IT175 I'd let go for only $2k.
The dude that bought it said he was more worried about having to replace the tires than the miles that were on the bike. The engine had never been touched save a water pump and stator at 70K. It was starting to get a little tired but still ran great and looked like new.

He paid extra for that superior Honda reliability and engineering!
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Old 02-19-2009, 09:12 AM   #7
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I had 68k on my '80 FLHP when I sold it, the only thing replaced was one exhaust valve and the electronic ignition was converted to points. My Trophy had almost 50k on it with no trouble, my K100RS was almost 50k. Proper maintanance and reasonable use will keep a bike going for a long time.
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Old 02-19-2009, 09:22 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarnali2 View Post
I had 68k on my '80 FLHP when I sold it, the only thing replaced was one exhaust valve and the electronic ignition was converted to points. My Trophy had almost 50k on it with no trouble, my K100RS was almost 50k. Proper maintanance and reasonable use will keep a bike going for a long time.
Why would you convert from electronic ignition to points?
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Old 02-19-2009, 09:39 AM   #9
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The Yamaha has impossibly long valve adjustment intervals. If the schedule was kept this bike will last long enough for you to grow tired of it before it expires.
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:07 AM   #10
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In 1980 Harley used a Motorola electronic ignition system that was fine for the time but expensive. Mine failed and I couldn't afford to fix it so I scrounged up the parts from a buddy of mine who owned a shop and converted it back to points. The way Shovelhead "cone" or alternator motors work is the cam is driven off crank, then the ignition is driven off the cam. When the factory went to electronic ignitions they just used the same mounting and drive set up merely replacing the spring & flyweight advance unit and the points and condenser plate with the electronic componants and rivited the cover on.

You simply drill the rivits out and remove the electronic unit and replace it with the points & advance parts and reset the timing. ..... CCI actually sold a kit for $20 or $30 but I just pieced one together for a couple of bucks and off I went.
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