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Old 11-20-2000, 05:49 AM   #21
Abe_Froman
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Default Re: I can relate to that...

This post deserves a much higher score than this.
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Old 01-13-2001, 04:02 PM   #22
900RR_girl
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Default Re: Biker Chick Reader Feedback

After reading her article , I giggled then said to myself that the occasional tip over happens. We are only human afterall. Hell, guys tip over too its just a hazard when on two wheels. The article was great and it gave a good insight as to what we go through being a "minority" ( if you will--*sighs loudly) on the road.



I ride a 900RR and yeah I get ALOT of questionable looks but for the most part they are all positive. I can count the number of times I have gotten a thumbs up from a car next to me at a stop light or a friendly hello from a car load of kids....kids really dig it! I think I get more positive feedback than negative. Especially of my track experience, when I ride I ride at my pace but serious at the same time. And men take notice and seem rather cool that a girl can drag knee's.



Sportbikes are no longer just for the guys and I think it's cool. So do the guys. Any man who is threatened by a woman on a sportbike is either jealous of her bike, or her riding ability.



Another note: Women that learn how to work on their bikes, changing wheels, oil etc etc have an advantage. When you do your homework you are less likely to get taken advantage of where ever you go.



When the helmet goes on the gender goes bye bye...we are all the same when we are riding. Im just one of the guys!

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Old 01-16-2001, 11:22 AM   #23
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Default Re: Biker Chick Reader Feedback

After reading her article , I giggled then said to myself that the occasional tip over happens. We are only human afterall. Hell, guys tip over too its just a hazard when on two wheels. The article was great and it gave a good insight as to what we go through being a "minority" ( if you will--*sighs loudly) on the road.



I ride a 900RR and yeah I get ALOT of questionable looks but for the most part they are all positive. I can count the number of times I have gotten a thumbs up from a car next to me at a stop light or a friendly hello from a car load of kids....kids really dig it! I think I get more positive feedback than negative. Especially of my track experience, when I ride I ride at my pace but serious at the same time. And men take notice and seem rather cool that a girl can drag knee's.



Sportbikes are no longer just for the guys and I think it's cool. So do the guys. Any man who is threatened by a woman on a sportbike is either jealous of her bike, or her riding ability.



Another note: Women that know how to work on their bikes, changing wheels, oil etc etc have an advantage. When you do your homework you are less likely to get taken advantage of where ever you go. Learn all you can, the minute you stop wanting to learn all you can you leave the door wide open.



When the helmet goes on the gender goes bye bye...we are all the same when we are riding. Im just one of the guys!

900RR Girl

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Old 01-16-2001, 11:29 AM   #24
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I agree 100%--- What is with the people who have fully tweaked bikes and end up with square tires? Some people are simply shop happy and went nuts at the retailer?



What's even funnier is the guy/girl on a bone stock bike hauling ass past the person who has a fully tweaked bike!



Sometimes people put WAYYYY too much emphasis on the goodies and forget how to ride, relying on the goodies to make them a better rider. Instead of getting good then buying the goodies to make them a better rider. There's a difference.



Squids can be seen a mile away, my personal saying-" Anyone can ride fast in a straight line, it only counts in the twisities"....



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Old 02-09-2001, 11:20 AM   #25
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Admittedly, I had to laugh a little reading about the bike droppings and especially the Ford Ranger vs. Bike mishap. I laughed because it reminded me of some of the "rookie" mistakes that I have seen/heard about/done. Dropped bikes? You bet. I have dropped two of them all by myself. One was at a stop sign trying to get a better look at a leak in a carb (which I did get once the bike was laying on its side.) The other was in my garage because my foot landed in an oil puddle from my car—ever see a guy do the splits over the top of a CB650? I bet you think that probably hurt?.…Uhhhhhh, yeah. (TIP: Remember kids, cowboy boots, oil on the floor, heavy bikes, and skinny punks don’t mix well; so use caution!) Moral to the story: mistakes are all part of learning and everybody has made them. Don’t be afraid to review your mistakes and discuss them with an experienced rider/instructor. Once you understand why your mistake happened, you will not do it again. It is truly amazing how much you can learn from another rider. As far as women riding bikes, I’m all for it. The more people that are welcomed into a sport, the further it will advance—yes, guys, that means it’s a good thing for you too. I want to praise you women who break the stereotypical bull S*** that women should cook, clean and play with little lacey dolls. That is total crap. You should do what makes YOU happy. If lacey dolls make you happy, fine, if riding motorcycles makes you happy, that is fine too. Don’t be intimidated by men, or other women into not trying something as fun as motorcycling. Remember, jerk’s (both men and women) are everywhere, bike shops (the very people who should want to expand their market by selling you a bike!), service departments, fellow riders, people on the road, and so on and so forth, you get the idea. Don’t let an idiot, or two, stand in your way. Do, however, take a safety training course, ask for help, talk to other riders, learn about the functional aspects of your machine, and wear a helmet at all times! Good luck to all, and wishes of many safe and rewarding miles.
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Old 02-09-2001, 11:24 AM   #26
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Default To each there own

To each there own, I like anybody on two wheels...except the jerks who don't wave !
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Old 02-09-2001, 11:50 AM   #27
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Try something heaver and taller like...how about an old air cooled 1100? Put it on a little angle and watch it high side you like a spatula under a flapjack. -- then have one of your friends help you lift it back up! Lighter, shorter bikes are easier to handle, that is a fact. Old and heavy bikes (like a lot of people try to begin on) are easy to drop -- trust me.
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Old 02-09-2001, 12:08 PM   #28
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I helped a friend cart home a very nice used CB750. I recomended that he should start out on my old CM200T and learn to ride before he jumped on a powerful, heavy bike. He didn't...My friend crashed the bike in the barnyard the first night he owned it! Good lesson learned. Too big of a bike for a beginning rider = trouble. The beginning guys and girls on 250's and 500's are the ones with a good mellon on their shoulders. Drivers ED cars aren't Porsche's for a reason.
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Old 02-20-2001, 03:33 AM   #29
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For what it's worth, more power to women who want to ride. I wish my wife would learn and get her own bike. I have a few buddies whose wives have learned to pilot their own bike and I think it's great. Back when I took the MSF course, there were several women instructors and about. Nearly half of the people in my class were women, but most were taking the course "just to learn more about it as passengers" and had no real intention of getting their own bike. Too bad.



If people have stereotypes about women bikers, screw'em. They also have stereotypes about male bikers and sometimes I get a little upset when I stop at the local 7-11 in leathers and some people seem to assume I'm there to rob the place.



As for "dropping bikes" I have to laugh at some of the things about "going over while standing still". I can remember when I was out as a newbie a couple of weeks after I got my license. I had a beat up old Honda 450 Nighthawk I got for a few hundred bucks and a lot of elbow grease to rebuild carbs, replace bent handlebars, etc. It had obviously been used to learn on by someone else too. Anyway, I was coming to a 4-way stop sign where there were already severl cars. I wanted to look like I knew what I was doing so I came to a perfect stop, head up, smooth, put my foot down on some loose gravel and slide right down. People got out of their cars to "help" me and that just humiliated me more.



The real problem was that the fall bent the shifter and I had to walk the bike across the street to mess with it. Fortunately I had a few tools like some pliers with me and I bent the thing back (praying that I didn't break it) so I could actually shift. Then the problem was I couldn't get into any gear above 2nd. I rode around the parking lot for about 15 minutes trying to break it free and finally did. I suppose we all look stupid now and then. It's been many years and three bikes later, but I still remember that and always give a quick glance to make sure I'm not planting my feet on marbles again

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Old 02-21-2001, 05:47 PM   #30
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Forget the sportbikes, cruisers, or any street motorcycle. If you want to live long and learn how to cope with all sorts of challenges, go dirt! Get a small (XR200 for example) dirt bike in fairly good mechanical shape, somewhat beat-up with a low price to match. Find an area to ride like your local motocross facility and do your crashing and bike wrestling in soft, rock-free dirt! At most local (small town) mx tracks they offer lessons and two hour practice sessions for like $25. If you are nervous about looking like a fool find other beginners or whatever your skill level and get a group rate. Those small arenas need to make money to stay in buisiness and it is a big plus for them to have some income when the track wouldn't be used. You will develop skills faster than any other venue I can think of. You might even end up doing some novice racing. Go see some of the regular races there are all levels represented and some ride slow enough that you could just about walk faster than they are racing! There are quite a number of little girls and young women getting into MX these days. Good luck!
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