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Old 09-08-2005, 03:09 AM   #1
mghempel
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

Get the small bike, ride a year or two on the road, and then upgrade.



I mostly ride old bikes (Brit bikes) with about 40 hp, and yet I find that on curvy roads I'm up there with the squids most of the time. Comes from learning good (smooth) technique. You'll be a better rider for starting small and learning to use what you have.
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Old 09-08-2005, 03:46 AM   #2
anrajala
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

You are aiming too low. Get a Suzuki SV650. Hard to see how it would be any less safe than a 250 Ninja. And then its a real bike. Good one too.



- cruiz-euro
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Old 09-08-2005, 03:53 AM   #3
IceWorm
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

The 250 is a fine selection, especially if purchased used. Plenty of people buy them new, ride a few miles, and then move up, putting their 250 up for sale at a bargain price. A year would be the minimum I would spend riding the quarter liter Ninja. The anticipation of moving up to a larger bike is always greater, in my opinion, than the actual move. Enjoy that anticipation for a year while you hone your skills on something a lot less likely to get you in trouble. Ignore all those who tell you that you can kill yourself just as fast on a 250 as on a 600. Oh yea, if you decide to go with a new purchase, ignore those who tell you to break it in like the way you are going to ride it. I suggest something off the wall like following the break in instructions in the owners manual.
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Old 09-08-2005, 04:05 AM   #4
Fenton
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

Do you think people say, "hey, did you see that one squid on the old Brit bike?"
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Old 09-08-2005, 04:24 AM   #5
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

Good thinking, but you might want to consider the Ninga 500 instead. A little more money but a little more bike. Maybe you'd find that you could put off that 600 for a while.
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Old 09-08-2005, 04:32 AM   #6
JLWarrior
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

A used Ninja 500/EX500, Suzuki GS500, Yamaha Seca 600.
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Old 09-08-2005, 04:36 AM   #7
HelterSkelter
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

Buy the 600, just use some self control with the noise-maker until you are thoroughly comfortable with it.



A huge part of being a successful motorcyclist is exercising self restraint, if you can't ride a 600 like a 250 then walk away.
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Old 09-08-2005, 04:45 AM   #8
GerardG
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

I'm new to the sport as well and bought a used Suzuki GS500. Its a lot nicer than the 250's I rode during the MSF course and has alot to offer the new rider. I've been very pleased with my purchase and am likely to get most of my money back when I upgrade next year. I priced out the Ninja 250 in the used market when I bought my GS500 and didn't see much of a difference in price.
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Old 09-08-2005, 04:58 AM   #9
clinging
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

I've read in more than one place that its more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow....



I'm riding an old Kaw 750 twin, and am considering upgrading to a 250 Ninja next year for the light weight, more nimble chassis, 13,500 rpm redline, and low price.
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Old 09-08-2005, 05:32 AM   #10
CaptainColon
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Default Re: NOOBIE bike questions

I've read in more than one place that its more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow....



So true...the great thing about the ninja is it's one of the few (only?) 250s that will do freeway speed (in the northeast anyway) all day long no problem, and STILL have a little room for more just in case.



If you've got the cash the 500 would be a great choice too, if only because the suspension is WAY better than the 250 (however you can always slap some 500 shocks on a 250 for like $50 if you do it yourself).



Like someone else already said...it's all about self control. I've ridden a Suzuki Intruder 800 since I got my license and have not had any problems whatsoever. IMO a hooligan will be a hooligan whether on a 250 or a 1000.



For a first bike I don't think displacement is important at all (barring insurance). What you should be considering is will the bike be a good bike for LEARNING to ride on, ie. is it going to let you develop as a rider? Is the torque curve basically flat or is it the bike going to lumber up through glitchy caburetion to 7k rpm, and then suddenly you'll be gripping the bars for dear life? How's the clutch? Does it engage nice smoothly with a big friction zone, or is it practically an on/off deal...and do you think that a sensitive clutch is going to make it a pain to ride or help you to learn better clutch control? Lots of other things to consider (brakes, riding position, drivetrain, vibrations, etc. etc.) but don't want to make this TOO long.



Unfortunately most of this stuff can only be figured out by riding the bike, which most dealers won't let you do, and the MSF only gives you a couple choices and they usually won't let you change bikes during the course. What I'd recommend is that you ask yourself what you want your bike to do (twisties, boulevard cruising, cross-country road trips, all of the above), then shop around, read reviews, find a friend or a friend of a friend or anyone that has a bike you're interested in and see if they'll let you try it out. Rather than just asking "hey guys what's a good beginner bike?" try "what would you guys recommend for a beginner looking for ."



Once you're fairly sure what you want your bike to do, it'll be easier for everyone else to help you out.



Ride safe!
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