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Old 10-22-2006, 10:48 AM   #41
SuperBill
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Default The World-Wide Common Denominator

CouldnÂ’t help but notice how beer always seems to work its way into these types of events. Thanks for the link!
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:54 AM   #42
DougandCarol
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Default Re: Winter Tires - MOronic Advice?

Bolixs! Come to Colorado in January and try it out first hand! A mere 40 mile commute at 70 mph on DRY PAVEMENT.
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:54 AM   #43
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Default Warm hands are a good thing

You might want to give heated grips another look, jbourne. Even with heavy gloves they make a world of difference. I paid big bucks for the BMW OEM grips on my old airhead, but the $25 heaters I bought from the folks at RiderÂ’s Wearhouse work just as good on my VTR 1000. HereÂ’s the link http://www.aerostich.com/catalog/US/...t-p-16539.html
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Old 10-22-2006, 11:23 AM   #44
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Default Re: Winter Tires - MOronic Advice?

I ride a Wee-Strom in the Denver area during the winter season...40-mile commute one way. Dual Sport tires work very well. Dropped a bike on some road gravel ... lost the front end that was shod with a ME Z6.

Wear a wind proof outer shell. Gore-Tex breathes too much at 65 mph but works well under a "windproof". A Schampa Pharoh balaclava for headgear works real well. The addition of a turtle fur neck warmer works wonders. The biggest problem is keeping your fingers warm. Check to see if the Wee-Strom grip guards can be modified for your bike. Most of all have fun! The looks you get from cagers is half the entertainment.

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Old 10-22-2006, 11:51 AM   #45
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Default Re: Warm hands are a good thing

Yeah, grip warmers are on the "to do" list for sure. Thanks for the link.



Which bit wears - the wiring, switch or the actual heat pads?
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Old 10-22-2006, 12:32 PM   #46
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Default Re: Winter Tires - MOronic Advice?

I have ridden a bicycle through several Massachusetts winters, but would never consider taking my motorcycle out when there's the possibility of ice.



The bicycle works because it is so light that its possible to slide the rear a lot and the front a little and still recover. Also, its hard to go fast enough to generate a fall that would cause serious injuries, unless one happened to fall into traffic and get run over, which is a real possibility.



If I were committed to learning how to ride a motorcycle in the winter, I would find an icy parking lot and use a beater motorcycle to learn how to cope with the slides. Even then, hit a patch of ice on a dry freeway at speed and you are probably toast.
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Old 10-22-2006, 01:39 PM   #47
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Default Re: Warm hands are a good thing

The wire breaks at the throttle grip. You leave a little loop to accommodate for throttle rotation, but after a year or so the repetitive motion either breaks the wire or the solder joint where it attaches to the film. In the five years IÂ’ve had mine on the SuperHawk IÂ’ve broken the wire once and the solder joint once. Both were easy to repair.
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Old 10-22-2006, 03:42 PM   #48
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Default Re: Winter Tires - MOronic Advice?

Sorry, but I can't help you with that one. Sounds like fun, though. By the by, the current "hot" setup for winter are the grip heaters over at www.dual-star.com



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Old 10-23-2006, 01:35 PM   #49
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Default Re: Winter Tires - MOronic Advice?

I really disliked the Z6. I don't like the way it handles. As for the solid patch down the middle, the front tire clears the path when you are straight. Pirelli also uses this method to some extent. It works well enough.



I like the AV46ST rear, but with a sport front.
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Old 10-23-2006, 04:12 PM   #50
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Default Re: Winter Tires - MOronic Advice? - Summary

Cool. I think we're done here. So here's a summary, 95% fact free!



Disclaimer: consensus has it that MOfos who ride their motorbikes in subfreezing temps. are defying the laws of rumor and urban legend by not sliding under a harvesting combine while backing out of their driveways, which while not apropos to the actual question, is a point well taken: riding a motorcycle near freezing or below is dangerous. Pay heed, weigh the dangers accordingly, buy life insurance for the sake of your loved ones, whatever.



Okay, so now that your imminent death is out of the way, here are the main consistent points:



(1) Tires don't matter much - folks tend to use the same tires year round. This is because ...



(2) tires don't warm up on cold surfaces, at all, especially ...



(3) sport tires which are particularly bad because they are apparently MOlto slippery when not warmed up, so don't use them.



(4) Sport touring tires seem okay if they are otherwise good for what you do and you expect very little of them.



(5) Enduro tires are a common factor in those who actually ride in sub-freezing conditions - so if they are good for you generally, they are a definite option for sub-freezing.



General advice (a lot of these are good for motorcycles generally, but consider them WRIT LARGE for riding sub-freezing):



(*) Reduce your speed - acceleration isn't the problem, its stopping.



(*) Hugely increase your allowance for stopping distance - downhill especially. That means, not only reduce speed, but start stopping a lot earlier.



(*) Don't pull up to the bumper of the car in front - leave enough space that you have options if someone rear-ends you.



(*) Keep sharp eyes on your rear view mirrors - motorcycles aren't the only vehicles that have trouble stopping.



(*) Be prepared to bail from your bike when stopped if someone behind you can't stop and you have no other options.



(*) Super sticky tires are not a good option - more likely to high side if/when they gain traction after a slip.



(*) Your tires won't warm up, so even if the roads are clear, don't depend on any kind of cornering forces and remember that corners could be interrupted by ice patches you're not expecting and can't see.



(*) Smoothness is paramount - easy clutch engagement, progressive braking, gentle acceleration.



(*) When you do slip, don't panic - try to keep the bike upright, don't apply the brakes or try to accelerate through it.



(*) As on all surfaces that have low traction, avoid the front brake - keep whatever traction and inertia your front wheel has for directional control and balance.



(*) Don't ride in urban traffic situations if you can avoid it - vehicles leave behind moisture from a bunch of sources - the worst being black ice condensed from the exhaust.



(*) If you do have to ride in urban traffic situations, pay particular attention to cornering - you will have to take it a lot slower and be prepared for icy patches - don't just hope for the best.



(*) If you have to get past some snow (or that chunky grey stuff that piles up around snow bound cities), drop PSI nice and low (5-10psi even) - make sure you have something to pump them back up again with when you hit the asphalt again.



None of which had much to do with my original question about tires, but we're MOrons, we don't expect too much right?



[PS. I think I'm gonna try the MT60s, if not then the Scorpions]

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