Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle News > Old News > Help!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-08-2006, 02:25 AM   #1
emiles
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 15
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

The longer you wait to get back on a bike, the harder it will be.

So go ride, but maybe stick to an area you know well and have always enjoyed riding.

Bets of luck!



First ..
__________________
-----
\"I know the human being and fish can coexist peacefully.\"
\"More and more of our imports are coming from abroad.\"
George W. Bush
emiles is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 05-08-2006, 02:35 AM   #2
abrandt
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 22
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

If you want to ride just get back on a bike go. If you had your fill sell the bike. I've dropped every bike I ever owned and I'm still ride'n.
abrandt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 02:44 AM   #3
pittsguy
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 10
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

I low sided my Daytona T595 on a ride in the Arizona mountains. I hit some black cinders and all #$%@ broke loose. I went squirting across an intersection on my side with the bike on top of me.



I wasn't hurt too badly, just shaken up a bit with a few scrapes and bruises. The real damage was to my riding confidence. I turned into a 'nancy boy' and would get very nervous in traffic. It took a while, but I was eventually able to return to whatever riding form I had before the accident.



As they say, 'You have to get back on the horse.' Fear is natures way of telling you to pay attention. Use it, but don't let it rule you. We take risks in riding, and on rare occasions, we have a spill. The one question you have to ask yourself is, 'Are the risks worth the reward?' For me, the answer was 'Yes.'



I also teach people to fly and the risk factor is very similar to riding a motorcycle. I've had two emergency landings in the last six months; both were in single engine airplanes and at night. I had to ask myself each time after an emergency landing, 'Are the risks worth the reward?' The answer was still 'Yes.'



I'm glad you're OK and I hope your answer to the question is also 'Yes.'
pittsguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 03:07 AM   #4
pick126
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 5
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

I was t-boned by a car causing the amputation of the right leg below the knee. When I returned to riding I was absolutely terrified the first 6 miles and extraordinarily cautious for the first several months.

Take it easy but just do it.

Porkchop
__________________
When the chips are down, the buffalo is empty.
pick126 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 03:40 AM   #5
acecycleins
Founding Member
 
acecycleins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 4,129
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

Go take and advanced rider's course. Your skills may be beyond that but it will serve two purposes. 1- it will remind you of safety skills you may have forgotten 2- it will give you a discount on your insurance. In GA they push you pretty good in these classes. It's always good to be reminded of things you should use in daily riding.
__________________
"Slack" - a state of being in which everything flows smoothly.....a frame of mind so at ease that the universe naturally cooperates.
acecycleins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 03:52 AM   #6
Redd_Dawgg
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 15
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

The only reason to assume the risk that comes with riding a motorcycle is if you really love riding. If you really love it, ride again.
Redd_Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 04:52 AM   #7
fastoldman
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 148
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

I had a van pull in front of me back in 1992, going straight into the side of it for a nice little broken jaw. I started to ride again while my mouth was still wired shut, and here's what I found:

I was very cautious, to the point of being a tad unsafe, for the first few months, during which I did basically nothing but commute. After that, I started to relax and enjoy it more, and became I think a much better, faster, safer rider because of my crash-induced caution. I don't think you ever get over the change, but I think it can easily be a help to your riding skills, provided you can get your confidence back.

The one thing I would recommend would be waiting until you feel excited to get back on, and then avoid the drudgery of riding (commuting around town), and head out to have some fun and comfortably get your confidence back. I would have avoided the commuting then if I had been a little wiser.

Most of all, like some others here have said, if you love it you shouldn't let a crash get in the way, but if you're ready to stop, just stop.
fastoldman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 04:58 AM   #8
bbtowns
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 540
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

Broke my ulna in 3 places in September. Ironically I just accelerated while going straight, turns out they had oiled the road that morning in anticipation of laying some gravel down, and hadn't gotten a sign up. I always imagined if I crashed, it would be in a corner, but this was in a mile long straight. The rear wheel just started spinning and wouldn't stop. First on-road crash in 400K miles!

Get back on and take it easy for awhile. It will all come back to you, might even make you a better rider!
__________________
What kind of man can abandon his family like that?
Seriously, who is he, I'd like lessons.
bbtowns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 05:18 AM   #9
electraglider_1997
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 640
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

Clean the caca out of your leathers and eat some oysters to regain the size of your jewels. Say a prayer of thanks for surviving and then get back on realizing that had God had room you'd now have wings.
electraglider_1997 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2006, 05:38 AM   #10
sarnali
Founding Member
 
sarnali's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,415
Default Re: Post-Crash Blues

I got hit last August, which was my first major accident in 26 years of nearly daily street riding. I was lucky to walk away with bumps and bruises though the bike was totaled. I certainly changed my perspective and that of a few friends of mine IE going from "skill and experiance will get us through" to "well sh*t I guess it CAN happen after all". Other than that, I never thought about not riding and when I got home from the hospital I rode my Thruxton around the neighbor hood a few times to excersise the demons, so to speak.



I avoid commuting on crowded freeways anymore if I can help it, but it's actually quicker to take secondary roads to work anyway 9 times out of 10 so that's no loss. If you still feel like riding then go for it, there's no set rules that you have to commute or you have to ride X number of miles a month. If you feel like going for a whizz then go, if you don't then don't. No ones going to look down on you if you decide the risk is too great anymore.
sarnali is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off