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Old 01-16-2006, 05:25 AM   #51
yoavy11
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Default Re: First Modern Sports Bike

HD Road Glide 67HP on 732 lb.

GSX-R1000 178HP on 366 lb.



The first accelerate like a sporty car, the second like an F-18 jet fighter. (well almost)



I don't think your mileage is the point, I believe the whole experience: the riding position, the different handling, bike geometry and the screaming engine with so much power on such a lightweight and stiff structure will hit you smack in the face and that you should ease into this experience in order to enjoy it the most and in the safest way. An open throttle past 8000-9000 RPM even on a 100 HP 600cc sportbike will open your eyes wide open if you don't know what to expect.

I really do believe that the Speed Four is your best bet. The Honda 599 is a little less sporty but a better all arouder which I donÂ’t think is what you look for. Both these bikes are based on pretty modern supersport technology in an easier to live with package.



Just delay your GSX-R1000 purchase for 1 year, you could still afford both these bikes with your budget and enjoy the liter monster the way your supposed to.

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Old 01-16-2006, 05:37 AM   #52
pudlepirate
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Default Re: First Modern Sports Bike

Yes, the speed triple may weigh 20 pounds more, but it also has another 20 hp and a 5 gallon gas tank. I wont even comment on your other examples power to weight ratios, I think we all see the writing on the wall. that said I have no particular beef with buell I just don't feel the need to deal with the harley davidson motor company.



I belive the weight comment was directed at the engine, not exactly cutting edge technology at work here, at least it's got overhead valves.

Oh I guess I do have a problem with buells, the belt. for the five minutes Of chain maintenance it takes every week I would not trust a belt, toothed kevlar or otherwise with 100 hp and 80ftlbs of torque. If belts were so great why does buells superbike contender have a chain? Thanks but I'll stick with my 'triple.
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Old 01-16-2006, 05:43 AM   #53
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Default Re: Um, not really

fair enough
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Old 01-16-2006, 06:27 AM   #54
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Get thee to a Buell dealer, my good fellow! "Turn-eating bike for thrill riding...low seat height". You just described the XB. You will love the big torque and friendly power curve when exiting corners. Add an aftermarket pipe for the best soundtrack in motorcycling. Huge fun!



Oh yeah; the badweatherbikers site is a must.



http://www.badweatherbikers.com/cgib...cus/discus.cgi
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Old 01-16-2006, 07:27 AM   #55
Tigercub
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Default Re: First Modern Sports Bike

Triumphs have excellent reliability - on par with or better than Honda, according to a survey done by Motorcycle Consumer News.

My experience with a Speed 4, which is no longer available and might have been a good choice for short inseam requirements goes as follows.



Currently I have 15,000miles on the bike in three years.



Problem #1. Leaking gas tap. I fixed this one myself with the same Ducati replacement part at $22. A year later the factory issued a recall for replacing both taps for free.



Problem #2. Right fork seal needed replacing. I removed the fork and had the dealer do it. $100.



Problem #3. Breather rotor seal blew. I replaced this one myself and it was very easy to do, but the seal cost $33!



Personally I expected no problems at all at this mileage, but my own survey suggests that it's about par for modern sport bikes.



I've done all my own maintenance including checking, but not adjusting, valve lash. If you check your own you can probably save a trip or two to the dealer. I've heard that valves on all modern sport bikes stay in spec for up to 20K to 30k. Some manufacturers now have 26k valve inspection intervals.



BTW, check out the Yamaha FZR I think it is. it's the R1 motor in a more sport touring set up with more upright handlebars and somewhat more torque.

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Old 01-16-2006, 07:33 AM   #56
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Default Re: First Modern Sports Bike

Not necessarily. I own a 2000 Daytona that I'm currently parting out on Ebay b/c the motor ate itself--completely seized during a track day. Yeah, I was running at a track day but:


-I'm a pansy track day rider at best, never pushed the bike to redline.
-I always changed the engine oil right before and right after every track day (probably did 5 on the Daytona over 3 years)
-It's a sportbike--it's made to do track duty, right?
-I did more track days on my Honda Hawk and caned the crap out of it comparitively (it made a lot less power, pushing the limit was required just to keep up), never had a problem.


As a fairly recent Triumph owner, I can say I won't own another one even though I'd love to give the 675 a try. Probably every manufacturer has owners who have had a bad experience and "won't buy one again". But, judging by how often exactly my problem is reported on at t595.net, I'd say Triumph has more than their share.


A modern sport-twin would be at the top of my list--Suzuki SV, Honda Superhawk, RC51 (if you can take the torture rack ergos) any Ducati (if you can take the maintenance costs or do your own)...take your pick.
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Old 01-16-2006, 07:35 AM   #57
Tigercub
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He's kidding. However, I have a friend (mid fifties) who bought a 2002, 1000 GSXR and loves it. His collection of bikes includes old Brit bikes including a favorite Norton, but no Harley's oddly enough. Anyway, he has the same philosophy as me. You may own a bike that is way beyond your capabilities to ride it to it's limit, but who says you have to ride it that way? I ride my sport bike like an old man - so what?!?!
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Old 01-16-2006, 07:35 AM   #58
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Default Re: First Modern Sports Bike

You didn't really state what your budget was but first off I'd totally avoid the litre bikes. They are not hop on and go type bikes.



I was in your position about 5 years ago. I had a H-D for 5 years and was looking for something more sporting. I ended up buying a Ducati ST4 which I still own. It gave me the familiarity of a V-twin powerplant but it is much higher revving than a H-D type twin. I love the Buell but to me it's not different enough if I already own a Harley.



Ducati Monsters are fun along with the Aprilia Tuono, FZ-1 or Suzuki SV1000.



I'm 5-10 and the MV Agusta Brutale is a great bike for someone small and has a high revving I-4 and is a blast to ride.



The Triumph 675 and Speed Triple look attractive as well.
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Old 01-16-2006, 07:38 AM   #59
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Default Re: Scr3w it!!!

I own an FLHS and a Triumph Speed 4 among other old Brit bikes and the combination is perfect. You are on the right track!!
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Old 01-16-2006, 07:43 AM   #60
Tigercub
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Default Re: First Modern Sports Bike

Be careful with internet relay of info on bikes like the Triumph. Triumphs are still mostly owned by older riders and we are much more likely to fix our own bikes than take them to the dealer to be fixed so the information is critical to fixing a bike as complex as a modern OHC bike and that information is easily found in these types of online discussions. I've almost never heard of a young Jap bike owner fixing their own bike. Not that there isn't the oddball around who does so, but it isn't the way kids spend their time today.
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