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Old 11-01-2005, 10:00 AM   #121
rocstar
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Default Re: Advice I wish I had known a year ago ...

you have serious issues.......i love my harley...i love my harley....i love my harley....i do i do i do i do
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Old 11-01-2005, 10:04 AM   #122
nesbit
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

You want a HD and got less than 10K. Do NOT buy a used machine! Not a good idea for your 1st MC experience. So, you're buying a new Sportster! Suggest you look at XL1200R. It has the 1200 motor, dual discs, a tach, and standard footpeg location. DO NOT PAY MORE THAN MSRP TO INCLUDE FREIGHT/SETUP! Bring your checkbook and do NOT cave. You'll get your price. Welcome aboard and ENJOY!
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Old 11-01-2005, 10:13 AM   #123
rocstar
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

90% of the deaths at Sturgis are people on Harley's...... thats because 90% of the people who go to sturgis ride Harley's
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Old 11-01-2005, 10:15 AM   #124
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

Old BMWs have a low seat height, and cg too, they are also relatively light , and they turn in easily.
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Old 11-01-2005, 10:25 AM   #125
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

If it was the worst commuter bike ever, I'm fairly certain he would figure it out quite quickly. It would be like taking a single speed bike (pedal power) out on some aggressive trails. Wouldn't take you to long to decide wrong move.



What he said was it work well for what he uses it for, and he enjoys it. It might not be the best out there, but he didn't make that claim either.
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Old 11-01-2005, 10:41 AM   #126
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

Actually, Since you haven't riden a street bike yet, I think you should complete the course first to see if this is what you want before considering commuting. When I took the basic course (21 yrs after riding my last bike) there was one person in the class taking it to see if he would like riding bikes before spending a lot of money, which I thought was brilliant! If you then like it and are comfortable, what you get for the next step is up to you. With in reason, there is no reason not to go with your heart on your decision and a sporster isn't a bad choice at all. I would, however, test ride one first to see what your comfort level is. It it isn't there, get some time on something used that is smaller and lighter for a while and then go for it. Just don't push yourself to ride what you think you should ride or what others think you should before you're ready. I wouldn't say it's going to be very expensive to commute with a bike (depending on the bike and the options you want), so I don't necessarily agree with that point. I've put 17,000 miles on my V-Strom 650 in the last 18 months and have gotten lots of gear, including my Roadcrafter suit (love it!), and it still is inexpensive compared to the gas burn on my Jeep. I get 48 mpg on regular (vs 16 mph for the Jeep) and commute daily unless it's below 35 degrees for short trips or 40 degrees for long commutes, rain or shine. It's definitely not for everyone but I still enjoy it more driving. Pretty sick, huh?



The expensive part of all of this is that no one's admitting to is the disease know as "mulitple bike-itis". I've succumbed to this and this is what becomes very expensive!! But that are the risks of motorcycling-Got to be cheaper than crack or meth anytime!



Oh, buy David Hough's books "Proficient Motorcycling" and "More Proficient Motorcycling", as someone has already mentioned. Well worth it!!
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Old 11-01-2005, 12:24 PM   #127
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

put this on your reading list.....and get a dirt bike first. Small one, 100/125 four stroke. Learn a little and live longer.





Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well (Paperback)

by David L. Hough



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Old 11-01-2005, 12:49 PM   #128
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

Shane: I found this book very useful for understanding the purpse for each type of bike, how bikes work, and how to handle them and how to inspect them.



The Motorcycle Safety Foundations Guide To Motorcycling Excellence Skills, Knowledge, and strategies for fight riding. 1995.Whitehorse Press, New Hampshire.



ISBN:1-884313-01-9





You've figured out ppl have differing oppinions about biking. Use what seems right for you based on your own beliefs and values.



Me Im 36 and been riding 24/7/365 since I was 18. Ridden, gh250, HD sportster 1200, BMW r1100rt, Duc ST2 and my current and fav is triumph sprint ST - just passed 95,000 km in almost 5 yrs.



good luck with your choice - play safe - your family needs you!









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Old 11-01-2005, 01:22 PM   #129
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

I've only been riding three years but here's a few things I've gleaned from my short time in the saddle:



a) I thought I knew what I wanted in a bike - I'm now finding that I want many things and hence would like more than one... give yourself time to evolve - that's the beauty of it - enjoy the ride first despite what you're on!



b) Keep it simple and fun. I decided on a 600 bandit as my first bike and loved it. Rode for over a year and then sold it on for more or less what I paid for it - excellent value for $3.5k - you won't go wrong with a solid beginner bike and your confidence will grow that much quicker as you won't feel so overwhelmed - you need to free up your head to deal with everything else that's going on, so the bike must be easy to manage - it's a lot different once you roll out of the MSF parking lot.



c) You mentioned that you want to ride with your wife - it may be prudent to get some time in the saddle yourself before riding two up - I know what my missus would do if I dumped the thing with her on it ) you think the bikes precious! If you've set your budget why not get a cheap starter bike for yourself... bandit, SV650 etc. for around $3K and keep the other $7k back for later when you want a mount for the both of you - the posts here have nailed a lot of the options.

I'm debating on another bike to ride with the wife - she's going to try a few rear seats and see what suits - I'm open minded about what'll work 'cause it's got to be comfy for both of us.



Good luck and spend that hard earned cash wisely!





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Old 11-01-2005, 02:54 PM   #130
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Default Re: Question from a newbie

Ok, so I am going to throw in another two-cents worth:

1. I also recommend David Hough's "Proficient Motorcycling" and "More Proficient Motorcycling." as well as checking out Jerry "Motorman" Palladino's DVDs: "Ride Like a Pro 3" and "Surviving the Mean Streets."



2. I have no idea what that means. I heard a lot of weird "advice" when I first got started. What I recommend is to go with your instinct when you hear this stuff: if it doesn't make any sense to you, you are probably right.



3. I strongly advocate wearing full, quality protective gear. Yes, I ride a Harley and yes, I always wear full gear, including a full face Shoei helmet, when I ride. If you do this you will be in the minority, but the smarter, safer minority. If you can, try on any gear you are considering before you buy. In general you get what you pay for; but not always. Definately get high quality gear, designed for motorcycling.



4. Motorcycles do typically require more maintance than a modern car but the cost on the Harley is not bad and the work is straight forward if you want to do it yourself. Like I said earlier - some Harley dealers offer a prepaid program for scheduled maintanence. I paid for the first four scheduled services on my Sportster when I bought it for much less than they would normally cost. Now I just call the dealer when its time, they pick it up, I ride it home without paying another dime.



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