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Old 08-15-2004, 02:16 PM   #1
Buzglyd
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Default Re: How NOT to destroy your bike in transit . . .

Take a bus and ride the bike home.



100 miles North of LA is the far reaches of Northern California?
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Old 08-15-2004, 02:50 PM   #4
locke24
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Default Re: How NOT to destroy your bike in transit . . .

100 miles? I ride half that to work and back everyday. Ride it back to LA. If you can't do that you do not deserve to own it.
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Old 08-15-2004, 03:06 PM   #5
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Default Re: How NOT to destroy your bike in transit . . .

I'm going to be the one nice guy on this thread and assume he meant to add an extra zero (although I have to wonder if California is even that length from north to south?).



I agree with the posts above.



If you have Saturday and Sunday off, I'd take a bus up there on a Friday evening or something. 500 miles a day is nothing on a bike.



Besides, how else would you want to spend your weekend? Driving it down in a day or riding it down taking your sweet ass time over 2 days?
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Old 08-15-2004, 03:41 PM   #6
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Default Re: How NOT to destroy your bike in transit . . .

I just trailered my bike to Murfreesboro, TN. that's about a 10 hour drive. I had a tie-down snap on the way. Here's my advice...



Use two tie-downs on each side, and a wheel chock. If you can, another tie down on the rear of the bike. Make sure you tighten them until the forks are compressed. Don't have to be all the way compressed mind you.



Put a cloth between the tie-downs an the bike if it looks like they make touch the fairings. No scratches!



Make sure you ain't crushing the brake and clutch lines with your tie-downs too. That's never good.



If you've never done this before, my advice is find someone who has, and take them with you. Buy them a 6-pack to make it worth their while.
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Old 08-15-2004, 03:43 PM   #7
flatspin
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Default Re: How NOT to destroy your bike in transit . . .

I was considering the purchase of a 2004 Daytona 955i that was at a dealer 600 miles away. Not wanting to ride a new (unbroken-in) bike that distance I found a company called Shipping Masters that specializes in moving bikes.(http://www.shippingmasters.com/pallet.htm) They will give you multiple quotes from transporters who will deliver your motorcycle to you. My quotes ranged from $629 to $450 depending on how the bike was going to be transported (individually crated, palleted, etc.), and the pickup/dropoff location. I ended up buying a Triumph locally (about 60 miles away) so I can't attest to how well the system works, but it sounded great. Still, I have to agree with the other posts and say you should just ride the bike back if it really is only 100 miles away.
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Old 08-15-2004, 04:18 PM   #8
Neal
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Default Re: How NOT to destroy your bike in transit . . .

some additions to above

Get some soft ties so you dont have to put tie down hooks directly to bike

Assuming you are using a truck and using the front of bed as "chock',make sure MC tire is at 90 deg and not ****ed.



Use ties on both side at back also(four on front two on back)

Use good tie downs



Good luck
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Old 08-15-2004, 05:15 PM   #9
Buzglyd
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Default Re: How NOT to destroy your bike in transit . . .

Border to border, California is a little over 900 miles. Salmon fishing as a young lad in Crescent City will convince one that California is a large state.



Still, a thousand mile ride on a Speed Triple is a piece of cake. If he was buying a used 996 I might suggest a truck.
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Old 08-15-2004, 05:34 PM   #10
IceWorm
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Default Canyon Dancer

You can buy a strap that slips over the grips called Canyon Dancer that provides a good attachment point for front tie down straps. You need to be cautious not to strap the bike down too tightly when using this device because it can put undue pressure on the right side throttle grip.



I cut the ends off of old socks and slide them over the tie down straps placing them at points on the tie downs that might rub against the bike. You can secure them in place with tape. I would ask the owner if he will siphon all the gas out of the tank. You don't need all that weight sloshing around up high on the motorcycle. If the bike rolls up to any kind of front wheel chuck I would strap the front wheel to the chuck, protecting the wheel paint with soft cloth from strap abrasion. No one has mentioned this yet, and although it seems obvious, I have seen people do it so, don't strap the bike down on its center stand.
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