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Old 05-13-2004, 12:44 PM   #62
Chango
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Default Re: Redesigned GS500

The only thing that has been redesigned on the GS500 is the plastic. There's a lot more of it to replace when you drop the bike now, as all new bikers will do. It's still the same engine, frame, brakes and everything else. I'm, not saying that's a bad thing. The GS500's seem to be more durable than ****roaches, there's just a higher replacement-barts bill when you actually drop it than there was previously. Personally, I liked the look of the older GS500's, but I was drawn to more power and stuff on the Bandit 600.



Anyway, I recommend a Suzuki Bandit 400, if you can find one. They are pretty cheap to own and insure, look good, don't have ridiculous amounts of power, and are quite fun to run around on. If you decide to move on later, you'll also have a better idea of what you really want in a bike. For example you might not like the idea of being bent over with your booty in the air for hours at a time on a sportbike, or maybe the giving-birth riding position of cruisers won't appeal to you. After riding a standard style bike for awhile, you'll know better.



P.S. - Flame on boys.
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Old 05-13-2004, 01:00 PM   #63
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Default Re: New Rider

I'll add another bike: A Suzuki Bandit 400. If you can find one they are reliable, good looking (too me at least), and fun. It also has all the power and handling you're likely to be able to use or need as a beginner. They aren't made anymore, but can be found for less than $1500 usually. If you can't find one of those, then most of the other bikes mentioned here would be okay until you can find one. Whatever you do, take the MSF course, and buy good protective stuff.





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Old 05-13-2004, 02:50 PM   #64
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Default Re: New Rider

They do have lowering kits for the KLR's. Slide the forks down a bit and lower the rear linkage with the kit.
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Old 05-13-2004, 09:04 PM   #65
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Default Re: New Rider

Get a trashed XR100, and burn gas like there is no tomorrow. Slide it around, fall down, whatever... just ride the pi$$ out of it.



Then take the MSF course so you start thinking about traffic, etc.



Then go shopping for a street bike. I promise you that starting with a small dirt bike will make you a better rider.



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Old 05-14-2004, 02:25 AM   #66
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Default Re: New Rider

Welcome to motorcycling! Your Dad makes a good point about starting off small and working your way up to a larger bike. Being a father myself I understand his concern, but a 50cc bike, I feel is too small. It would barely go fast enough on the road to keep up with traffic and thats not safe either. The Ninja 250 and 500 are good bikes, and there are plenty available used. At your height, I would think the small cruisers offer a better seat height for you and a less powerful engine. Yamaha Virago 250 and 500 (I think theres a 500), Kawasaki make a 500cc cruiser, Hondas Rebel 250 and Nighthawk 250, there are plenty of smaller displacement bikes that have a unintimidating power delivery. Not all 500cc-600cc bikes are the same! The smaller cruisers that I mentioned above make easy power, maybe 35-50 hp and its available without having to rev the cr*p out of the motor. On the other scale, a similar displacement sport bike, produces a 100hp and will scare you to death the first time it gets away from you. Check the used buys, check the web sites and see whats out there, there are plenty of used bikes to be had for not much money, and you won't lose much when you decide to sell it. Spend more on protective gear, like your jacket, pants, boots, gloves and helmet. Its more important to get that right in the beginning than the coolest bike you can afford! But also get a bike that you like and you are comfortable on otherwise you won't want to ride it and where's the fun in that?



Absolutely take an MSF course and learn how to ride correctly. Harley dealers also offer a 'Riders Edge' course which is similar to the MSF courses but has much smaller class sizes, and in my opinion is a better course, but its more expensive ($300-$400). It is worth the extra money though, Dad! I'm not a Harley guy, but the course and the instructors were very helpful, its worth every penny. There you learn on fairly new Buell Blasts, which are a great learners bike as well. So check those out used! Hope this has been some help to you. Good Luck!
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Old 05-14-2004, 03:20 AM   #67
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Default Re: New Rider

Speedometer Sender went at about 1000 miles. 7 days to get part and repair. But I understand that they had installed a bad batch. At about 1500 miles the Computer/Solenoid that controls the Choke, broke, and the bike would not start. 10 days to repair. At about 2000 miles, there was an oil-leakage at the bottom of the cilynder - but I understand that this has been fixed on recent blasts by not using a gasket in that area. 3 days to get fixed, and $200 - not under warranty they said... I sold it then! And I have a Buell M2L Cyclone, that is an even worse Maintenance Hog... but I believe that the newer Blasts are better... but still not as good as the Japanese yet. Have a Nice Day!
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Old 05-14-2004, 03:43 AM   #68
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Default Re: New Rider

Probably faster through the 1/4 mile than my Nighthawk 250 too.

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Old 05-14-2004, 03:50 AM   #69
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Default Re: New Rider

Good point about lowering the bike. We lowered a KLR650 so my wife could ride it. We installed lowering links on the rear suspension and raised the fork tube in the clamps. No problem now. People neeed to know that with lowering links, shorter shocks, changes to the seat etc., many bikes can be tailored to suit those with short inseams.
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Old 05-14-2004, 04:20 AM   #70
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Default Re: Well said

Yep I agree, the above is very good advice. But I would start with a Ninja 250 instead of a 500.

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