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Old 05-07-2002, 10:12 AM   #41
Le_Racer
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Default "Naturals"

Salut!



Nicky might be only 20 or so, but for how long he's been riding? Like since he was about 4...



Same apply to "Bubba" and Pastrana in MX.



You may see some that have it easy the first time they ride but they still have to develop their skill thru practice.



Ciao!
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Old 05-07-2002, 05:59 PM   #42
mxzxracer
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Default Re: How do I change direction while in a turn?

Everyone has been right on with the whole counter steering bit so I won't go there. The one piece of advice that I have is where you learn to ride the bike. Find yourself a nice quiet straight that you can see for a mile or so and start weaving back and forth from white line to white line. Start slow 40mph and run in 2nd or 3rd gear (this keeps the revs up and keeps the bike from feeling like it will just fall over, the gyroscope effect) as you get more comfortable go faster and lean the bike further. This will alow you to get the basic feel for counter steering the bike with out worring about who is coming around the corner at you. Before you know it you will be dragging foot pegs!!!
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Old 05-13-2002, 04:27 AM   #43
chariton
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Default Re: Don't look!

Of course! I got half the kit (Helmet, kevlar gloves and a cordura jacket before I got the bike). I'm saving for the other half but until then I always wear jeans and boots when I ride
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Old 05-13-2002, 11:45 PM   #44
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Default Re: How do I change direction while in a turn?

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Thanks Guys! You are great!

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<p>

It's the first time I've seen so many serious/thoughtful posts filled with so much advice. I really feel honoured (and spoilt) by all the attention.

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<p>

I really appreciate all that have posted messages. I got Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist 3 months before I got the bike along with David Hugh's Proficient Motorcycling and the MSF's guide to riding as well. I have read them all and I understand what countersteering is (one of the first things I tried when I got the bike). I don't know how to apply it fully yet. I'm a little enlightened after all this reading and I will practice as much as I can.

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<p>

I always wear my fullface helmet, cordura padded jacket and kevlar coated riding gloves every time I ride. I am saving money for pants and boots but for the meantime I always wear a heavy duty pair of jeans and boots. They showed that they were worth every penny of the $800 (more or less) I shoveled to get them.

</p>

<p>

I was returning from a small trip to the mountains where we have some excellent, and above all, bendy roads. It was mainly to practice countersteering and that had gone well. Following my previous escapade I was extra cautious, AND SLOW, in both going up and coming down. I was pleased with myself but after 80 miles of going up and down the mountain my bottom was definitely getting fried on the saddle. A sensation that everyone must have felt at some point after their first trip... Anyway I got into town, and the inevitable traffic lumbering slowly. Due to a epidemic of traffic lights sprouting all over town moving around is a nerve raking stop & go experience (for the car drivers anyway). For the bikes it's a balancing act of weaving through traffic, getting to the front, getting ahead... Only to meet the next line of cars, weaving through traffic, getting to the front, getting ahead... Except that at the last traffic light before I got home the ritual stopped abruptly!

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<p>

While going at a mere 15mph the lady driving the BMW in front of me decided to brake for no apparent reason. I over reacted and I locked the front brakes which resulted in me being thrown off the bike and sliding face down on the pavement for about 15 feet. Seeing the pavement go by from 2 inches away is another enlightening experience... It was almost dreamlike. The padding in the jacket absorbed the impact getting slightly scrathed in the process. I barely felt hitting the pavement. The helmet acted likewise for my head rescuing my face from french kissing a sand paper treadmill and the gloves... Well I had gotten the gloves off a little outside town, so my left knuckles gave me a small example to what might happen to my face. The jeans were ruined but the boots held to their promise but I was in PAIN!

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<p>

No, the heart rending pain was not from my scratced hands nor from my bruised left thigh. Watching my brand new bike sliding in front of me was like sliding a scalpel accross my eyes. It slided, and it slided, until it stopped on the BMW's rear fender nicking it just there. I instantly got up feeling only a little lightheaded. But I could feel the headaches lining up to get theirs... I immediately tried to get the bike up. Only to have it fall on the other side. Fortunately a friend was sitting at the cafe opposite the street came to my rescue. Got the bike up. Helped me get it of the road. <br>

"Is it you?", he asks since I was still wearing my helmet.<br>

"Who do you think it is?", I answer wryly.<br>

"You OK?", he asks now more concerned.<br>

"Yeah", I answer,"thanks to the armor."<br>

...<br>

...<br>

...<br>

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<p>

The rest is well known fare. The police came... The insurance got notified...bla, bla, bla...<br>

At the end of the day though I was left with the invoice for the whole mess.

Price for fixing the beemer's fender: $100.<br>

Price for fixing my broken fairings and repainting them :$160 . Special price, mind you...

Price for keeping my squidly pride: vague answers and lies to questions over the bikes whereabouts...

Price for reminding me that humility and constant alert are the keys to survival for every new rider and, finally, that I have a long long way to becoming the rider I dream of: ... Still being evaluated by the local life accountants (aka my parents, girlfriend, etc.).

</p>

<p>

A really long post. But I couldn't resist the temptation. Thanks again for all the great advice!

</p>

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