Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle News > Old News > Harley-Davidson News

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-22-2001, 11:56 PM   #41
starvingstudent
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 486
Default Re: Harley math

Punctuation is our friend--I normally don't sweat this sort of thing, but I had to re-read your post several times before I understood what you were getting at.



That said, if you're concerned with restoring a 70s vintage bike and replacing "whole engines," I sure hope you're doing it because you ENJOY it, not doing it because it's economically practical. Buying a 1985-90 CB750 would probably be significantly cheaper than getting a 1976 Superglide running smoothly--ESPECIALLY if you have to swap out a "whole engine." Heck, last summer I met a guy selling a 1980 CX500 that ran beautifully for $1000 obo. If all you cared about was economics, buying that CX would make a whole lot more sense than either struggling with a 550 that was having trouble OR working with a 1976 HD.



If you want to restore that old Superglide, by all means do it. It sounds like a really fun project, and it sounds like you really like the bike. But don't do it because you feel it's less expensive than dealing with Japanese machinery. That's simply not true.
starvingstudent is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 12-23-2001, 04:31 AM   #42
Spinetingler
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 19
Default Re: Harley math

You reveal yourself the more you write. Where did the unpatriotic statement come from??? Have a hangup?? What do you care what anyone says?



I do agree with your last statement - people should ride what they want. Even your own conclusion states that either way, one buyer is not fiscally better than the other and it should go by what people prefer.



Would you agree that your first pointwas to state that the HD buyer was NOT better off? You have now come full circle to your above statement, it doesn't matter what the price, just go ride!!



I, in counter to you, do not agree with the savings argument because of two reasons - your interest rates are agressive (current rates are much lower given the average consumers ability to earn it and 2) Americans do not save - they spend (generally).
Spinetingler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 05:05 AM   #43
fr21555
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 22
Default Re: Harley Davidson is Company of the Year

Here's my holiday two-cents worth:



1- Yes, congrats to H-D for running a successful business, which is their mandate, first and foremost.



2- I'm an owner of two used Evos, never to buy any of the new models because they don't appeal to me in the least. The V-Rod is a joke, a bad one.



3- The comparison to cost of H-D s an investment vs Jap bikes is stupid, as is the notion the Jap bikes aren't "disposable". Of course they are! The marketing behind those is just as focused as H-Ds, but on the other end of the spectrum. One company sells the "history and "tradition", the other pushes the "technology advancement", "radical styling and performance" angle. The Jap companies WANT you to plan on buying a new model every year. How many sport bikes do you see out there that are more than 10 yrs. old? I can tell you in my part of the country they few and far between. I owned several and did manage to keep them 10 yrs or more but I was the only one in my group that did.



4- Everyone has their preferences, that's why God made chocolate and vanilla, I'll leave it at that...Happy Holidays to all!
fr21555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 11:40 AM   #44
kawasakiLTD
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 3
Default Re: Harley Davidson is Company of the Year

Am I to assume no more 600 Shadow?
kawasakiLTD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 12:04 PM   #45
starvingstudent
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 486
Default My bike

Yep. Saturday was the day at the dealership. The Shadow is a great bike--took care of me perfectly for 4 years--but it wasn't right for my interests and wants anymore. The SV had me hooked from 50 feet into the test-ride.
starvingstudent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 12:30 PM   #46
starvingstudent
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 486
Default Re: Harley math

The whole unpatriotic thing--something I have experienced in person many times, as well as on these forums. Getting that sort of attitude is why I don't go to motorcycle rallies anymore. It's one of the reasons that some people bash HD riders--they don't realize that the jingoistic a-holes on HDs are a vocal minority.



Why do I care what they say? Well, when they say it to my face, it's unpleasant. I don't care what they THINK, but when they get in my face about it, it is irritating. I don't like being falsely called a traitor to my nation--it's just that simple.



I do believe that economics don't matter, you should just go ride. HOWEVER, I also believe that buying an $8000 Kawasaki is just as economically practical as a $20,000 Harley, so long as you invest the rest (I am earning 4% APR on my savings account right now, and banks are not extra-generous to sometimes-employed starving college students, so I know 4% APR is not an unfairly high #). The two ideas are not mutually exclusive.



If you didn't have $20,000 to begin with, then the argument is moot--as in my situation. I could afford to drop $6k for a bike, but I simply did not have the $20k for a non-depreciating bike--even if I thought it WOULD make more sense in the long run.



As for "Americans do not save - they spend"--well, in that case, buying a cheaper bike lets you buy $12,000 extra toys that you couldn't have had with the $20k bike. Buy someone who admits that "they don't save, they spend" should not be basing the purchase of a recreational motorcycle on economic practicality instead of fun factor.



As a final important point--I was not trying to state that buying Japanese makes MORE sense than buying Harley-Davidson--just that it makes AS MUCH sense. Interest rates differ, and people do not ack with 100% economic sensibility, but the sentiment that "buying Japanese is economic suicide because the bikes depreciate in value" leaves too many factors out of the equation.



Keep the rubber side down,

Eric
starvingstudent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 02:05 PM   #47
wwalkersd
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 246
Default Re: Harley Davidson is Company of the Year

Heavens! You mean to tell me there are still places where one can buy a house for only 100 thou?
wwalkersd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 06:09 PM   #48
nome
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 30
Default Re: Harley math

you just don't get it-maybe you just can't
nome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 08:48 PM   #49
TheFox
Founding Member
 
TheFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 730
Default Re: Not really

I suppose I see your point.
__________________
--The Fox

The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.
TheFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2001, 09:22 PM   #50
TheMadScientist
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 8
Default Re: I think you missed the point.

OK, so let's say Harley's a twice the price of a Japanese bike. Is it all that much better when you compare 10 Japanese bikes with a house?



An average car costs $20,000. How about 5 cars?



And what about Sportsters, which cost around $6,000? Or Dyna Standards for around $11,000. Or Softail Standards for around $13,000. Or Electraglide Standards for around $14,000. I mean there's a whole bunch of non-FatBoys out there. And the MSRP for them is around $15,000.



I'm not bragging about what I'm worth. Los Angeles is an expensive place to live and a cheap house here in a marginal neighborhood is $250,000. If you're ever offered a job here, keep that in mind when they make you an offer. And I didn't pay $500,000 for the house, that's just what it has appreciated to. I couldn't afford to buy the same house today, no way, no how.



People act like $20,000 is this immense amount of money, but when you consider how much cars cost, a lot of people must have that much to spend on their vehicles. If you're serious about riding, you spend more on the bike and buy a car for when you can't ride, for whatever reason.



I know I spent what I consider a lot of money on my Harley, as did my wife. About $14,000 out the door. But the bikes are our main transportation, and we ride around 15,000 miles a year. If they were just toys to take out on weekends, we wouldn't have bought them. They're an integral part of our lives.



Y'know what really gets me? Here in LA, Harleys go for MSRP. But in Oklahoma where people make less money, the dealers rip people off to the tune of $3-6K over MSRP, and people *pay* it. It's just unbelievable to me.



TMS--Los Angeles
TheMadScientist is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off