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Old 12-03-2001, 11:43 AM   #71
Eric
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Default Re: V-Rods at dealers this week

I just test rode the V-Rod at my local dealer, though only for about 15 miles. There was quite a line, even in the middle of the day Monday. I normally don't like the cruiser riding position, but I actually found the V-Rod quite comfortable up to about 85 MPH. Even then it was not too bad.



The engine sounds good once you rev it a little; it is very quiet at idle. No vibrations. Below 3 grand, it feels like any other V-Twin cruiser. 3-5, you feel the storm brewing, let it keep going and you have to hold on tight and get ready to shift. I have test ridden Ducatis and Triumphs, have owned Hondas and Harleys (FLHs), now own a Buell. Of the bikes I have ridden, the engine felt most like the Duc in where the power is in relation to RPM, though way more powerful and smoothly injected (I rode the ST2). The injection was as close to flawless as I have ridden.



The front end feels WTF out there, because it is. I didn't get to do many turns, but on the tight, clover leaf on-ramps, it felt very stable. It felt much better than other cruisers I have ridden in that regard and permitted a higher speed than I would have thought.



The only thing I didn't like is the key location, right under your leg. The transmission was also not as smooth as I would have liked, but I never hit a false neutral. The clutch was also good. Would I buy one? Not yet -- I'd wait until there is a little more supply and (hopefully) a model with a less raked-out front end.



One final, non V-rod thought -- when you reply to the truly inflammatory rhetoric, whether by Harley haters or Japanese haters, all you do is provide the opportunity for that person to respond again. You can't persuade people who could never admit they are wrong.
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Old 12-03-2001, 12:42 PM   #72
tbuse
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Default Re: That

While not supporting the views of Todd whatshisname, I have to say that your example of the London bike messengers is misplaced. I had a long talk with one last time I was in London. He said he'd love to have a Harley, but for the type of riding he did, they were just too big. He also said his bike was going to go down, usually several times a year. His messenger bike (under 250 ccs if I remember correctly) was cheap to replace if necessary.
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Old 12-03-2001, 12:48 PM   #73
tbuse
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Default Re: Are you really that stupid or are you just goading us?

Again, I don't support Toddwhatshisnames views, but your rebuttal is pathetic. I've owned four Shovelheads and an Ironhead Sportster (AMF era bikes.) As long as they are properly maintained, they are very reliable. Any bugs they had from the factory were worked out long ago. They're also everywhere. While this guy's views are xenophobic, your respose is just plain ignorant.
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Old 12-03-2001, 12:54 PM   #74
tbuse
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Default Re: Only in your wildest dreams

Jeez. Stupid comments from a xenophobe are answered by ignorant drivel. A Harley will usually be around longer just because they change so little. The Big Four (or is that Big Three now) change their sportbikes so much that this year's model is elipsed by next year's and last years has become obsolete. Then five years down the road parts are no longer available. The Japanese make some good bikes, but your comment is just plain dumb.
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Old 12-03-2001, 12:57 PM   #75
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Default Re: Depreciation isn

You must have a very "generous" speedometer.
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Old 12-03-2001, 01:21 PM   #76
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Default Regarding motorcycle couriers

I remember both reading an article on couriers (Rider? Cycle World?) as well as observing them first-hand while I was in London. For those working in the city, low price is an issue because accidents aren't too rare. But not everyone uses 125s and 250s: the CX500 (known to its riders as the "maggot") is EVERYWHERE, and it hasn't even been built in, what, 10 years? The fact that it still exists (not to mention being common) in a high-crash job testifies to the fact that none are lost because of mechanical failure. Inline-fours with shaft drives (such as the Nighthawk 700S and some square-headlighted Kawasaki) are also common.



Long-distance couriers (when that package has to get from London to Edinburgh TODAY) tend to use ST1100s or R1100RTs, since they don't have to worry about fender-benders and need better luggage and wind protection.



Then again, when I was in Edinburgh, I met a guy who swore that early-90s MuZs were the most attractive motorcycles in the world, so maybe the British shouldn't be trusted too much.
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Old 12-03-2001, 02:16 PM   #77
CBR1000F
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Default Re: Depreciation isn

HAHAHAHA! ROTFLMFAO! Now I know you're an idiot.



I'm not a Harley-basher, I kind of like them and would own one if I had the money...



But you're a moron if you think that H-D's last longer than Japanese bikes. How many miles on your H-D?



How many times have you had the engine apart?



How often and how hard do you ride?





Me?

'93 Honda CBR 1000F

55,000 miles.

Still going strong.

Read about several over 100,000 miles and still kicking just fine.



The older H-D's that are nice are that way because somebody put a lot of time an money into KEEPING them that way. It's not a testament to H-D engineering. It's a testament to the owner. Friend of mine's riding a '78 RD 400... a TWO STROKE that is still running well after 20+ years. He's talking about doing a rebuild this winter... its' first, he thinks. Does this make his RD a reliable bike? Or just one that's been well taken care of?
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Old 12-03-2001, 04:09 PM   #78
aminalmutha
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Default Re: V-Rods at dealers this week

Two words: Caprice Classic. Big, heavy, American tank. Seems the 'orientals' aren't the only ones with optimistic naming practices.
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Old 12-03-2001, 04:15 PM   #79
aminalmutha
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Default Re: V-Rods at dealers this week

I have (Sportster 1200) and it nearly shook my retinas loose. Seriously, it blurred my vision at idle. (I do actually like the Sporster, except the vibration at idle is unacceptable)
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Old 12-03-2001, 04:41 PM   #80
pistonbroke
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Default Re: V-Rods at dealers this week

Personally, I think that Harley are heading in the wrong direction with this one. I am a jap bike rider, but I have ridden several harley's and they do have a quality and riding experience all of their own. To design a cruising bike that is intended to be revved, is a bit like putting a honda cr500 engine in an enfield bullet, totally wrong. One of the reasons that Harley's have increased in popularity over the recent years, especially with long term riders of mainly sportsbikes, is the fact that you can combortably ride tham at the speed limit all day, and still enjoy the ride! It is not uncommon these day's to see a couple of harley's in amongst a group of sportbikes etc. and they are always the guys that look most comfortable when they get off their bikes ( just look at the bloke getting off the 916 next to them, after sitting close to the speed limit for a long ride.) With modern policing, riding at the high speeds necessary to make the latest crop of sportsbikes enjoyable to ride is becoming increasingly impossible to get away with. So, I really think that harley should be concentrating on refining what they already have, a comfortable, long haul machine that could do with better brakes and suspension to go along with the lack of speeding offences and a long term license.
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