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Old 10-25-2006, 07:14 AM   #1
rbitra
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

first
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Old 10-25-2006, 07:28 AM   #2
bradbarker738
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

There was a story right here on MO if I remember correctly about a guy in New Orleans who got his Honda Nighthawk 750 running no problem after Katrina. As I remember, his bike was completely submerged. Maybe you should give him a call. Of course that was a Honda.
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Old 10-25-2006, 07:46 AM   #3
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

And here it is...

http://www.motorcycle.com/mo/mcgabe/...rs/index.motml



Maybe Gabe knows how to get in touch with this guy.
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Old 10-25-2006, 08:20 AM   #4
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

Are they Harleys? If so the engines are pretty easy to pull apart and clean. Since you've got a lot of money in them I assume they are HDs or GoldWings. GoldWings are going to be a bytch to clean up.



Yet another reason why I never spend more than $3-4K on a bike.
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Old 10-25-2006, 08:24 AM   #5
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

First thing I'd do is a fresh water wash down. I'd almost rather swim in used motor-oil, flood waters are Nasty. Then, after it dried I'd go through a can of WD-40 on everything that might look electrical trying to displace water. I'd then clean and dry the bike. I'd be careful about water in the cylinders and would "spin" the engine with the spark plugs out. Replace the oil and take a look at other fluids for contamination. I'd try to fire it up and let it run at least until it reached operating temp.



I'd consider a washing/dunking/cleaning the seat somehow.



Feel for you, floods screw things up in ways you don't usually think of.
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Old 10-25-2006, 08:51 AM   #6
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

Unless they were submerged for a prolonged period, the greatest potential problems will be electrical and smelly upholstery. Drain and flush all the fluids; remove, disassemble and clean the carb(s). While you are there (intake system) spray the valves with WD40 or Seafoam Deep Creep or some similar moisture dispersant. Physically disconnect and clean every electrical connection you can find. Switches may be a problem if you cant disassemble them. Be very careful about doing a very good job on the brake system. You may have to replace the pads. Once you are satisfied with the cleaning and every thing is back together fire them up and run them till they are completely up to temp. in all respects. Then change the oil and filter again and go riding.
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Old 10-25-2006, 09:09 AM   #7
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

If salt water, take the settlement and run. The salt will have all the electrics hosed with some problems not showing up for possibly years. Salt is nasty and will cause pretty much anything to corrode over time! Generally not worth it to try to restore it unless the bike is an antique or not replaceable. If the amount is too low in your mind, that is what your insurance commissioner is for. You can also get a lawyer. Also check and see if you live in one of the states that give you the choice of money or replacement (like the state I live in). Once the evil insurance adjuster knows that you are aware of that option, if it is available, they become mush easier to deal with. The insurance company generally only pays fair market value of the stock bike. If you have heavily customized (like fancy paint, extra chrome, engine mods, whatever) and did not have this stated on the policy, you were not insured for it, sorry.



If fresh water, wash the bikes, real well. Flush the tanks (radiator, gas and oil), drain the tranny and the engine of all fluids if possible, replace the oil (and cooling fluid) with what you normally use (don't go cheap just because you are going to flush it again), do a "major" tune up to the bike (plugs, wires and whatever else your manufacturer says to replace), treat all the leather with your choice of leather cleaner/conditioner. Replace any relays or "black boxes" if you have electrical problems. Also make sure there is no water in the lights or in the frame itself. Say a little prayer that they will start, then run the bikes until warm, flush the fluids (all of them all over again), refill and hope for the best...



As someone else posted, you may have problems with the leather stuff and some electric glitches if a sealed component was compromised down the road so be prepared for that.

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Old 10-25-2006, 09:55 AM   #8
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Default Re: Motorcycles involved in a flood

I'd just like to give you some confidence. I ride dirt bikes and have submerged my bike a number of times, once in thick mud which had me pretty concerned. Indeed silty water got in everywhere, but you can totally wash out your bike, inside and outside. Motorcycles are made to get wet and undergo incredible stresses, they can handle getting dirty if you clean them up properly. If you clean your bike out with solvents (some people clean their tranny out with kerosene, for instance), make sure you let it dry out too; the solvents will break down oil you put into your engine. I would simply change your oil VERY frequently for about four or five oil changes (after every ride); use cheaper non-synthetic oil (still motorcycle specific, however!) for these oil changes. You'll see the oil come out milky-colored as it absorbs moisture in the system; after a few changes though most of the moisture should be out of the system.



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Old 10-25-2006, 10:08 AM   #9
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Default Re: Trade you straight across...

for a 1 year old XB9SX. Never down. Like new.
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:23 AM   #10
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Default Re: Trade you straight across...

What the heck happened to the top end on that thing? Burn all the valves or something? Warp the heads? What's the story? Just report the thing stolen and I'll take it off your hands.
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