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Old 06-02-2005, 03:31 AM   #41
fireworks
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

It's pretty obvious that these bikes are completely under used by the riding public and are all about the bling. The only bike out of the current crop of litre bikes that I'd look at is the Fireblade (The last gen GSXR is another choice, because of it's size and stablility, and they're cheap right now) because it won't wheely unless you really try, has an awesome steering damper, has some meat on it, and it 'should' be reliable because it's a Honda. Basically, it looks like stable ride. Wouldn't even dream of working on it though. Maybe this is just a misconception on my part though. I would, however, not think twice about tackling something on a Harley though.



So, what bikes make good road bikes (forgiving nature, reliable, all weather, not super expensive to fix, etc)?



My list is:

Harley Sportster 1200 Roadster

Triumph Daytona 955i

Triumph ST

Kawaski ZX6 pre 2003

Kawaski ZX9 pre 2003

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Old 06-02-2005, 03:42 AM   #42
xseal
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

Another 2005 GSXR1000 broke in half when it impacted a tire wall racing at Summit Point, WV, this weekend. That is the second one that I've seen sever at the welds on the frame spars.



Sounds like a systematic problem, frame is too weak.
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Old 06-02-2005, 03:43 AM   #43
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

Lap dancers, huh? Well, it certainly is nice to know that someone around-here is supporting the Arts.



I'm 51, so I'm probably in your demographic and probably have a similar mind-set: bikes that actually look like a motorcycle, don't need a MIT degree to fix, and you'll be able to find parts for sometime after next-week. Japanese technological-improvements are a two-edged sword. First: they keep getting better-and-better. Second: nobody knows what parts are interchangable from year-to-year; and who wants to walk through a junk-yard carrying a reference manual?



I'd go with a pre-V-Tec-nonsense VFR.



Good Luck!





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Old 06-02-2005, 03:58 AM   #44
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Default Re: Too close to the edge?

I'm glad you brought that up. From my small experience with race cars I can tell you that they're fragile and finicky and would never last 500 miles on the street. I don't see any reason why bikes wouldn't be the same.



The "track work is tougher than street use" theory probably works well for brakes, trannies, and motors, but when it comes to frames and suspension bits, 2000 miles a year on a marble smooth racetrack is nothing compared to the rigors of potholes, curbs, bott's dots, small dogs, and whatnot that you find on the road.
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Old 06-02-2005, 04:07 AM   #45
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Default Consumer's Reports: Oz Edition: 06/03/2010...

Nike engineers have be networking with Charles Manson, in the development of - what is rumored to be - 100+hp roller-blades. Further deatails will be available, after I take my medication.



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Old 06-02-2005, 04:20 AM   #46
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

Given the liability that would go with failing to adequately engineer a manufactured product, the need for reliability to remain competitive, and the ever-advancing state of design and manufacturing technology, my sense is that if anything, new bikes are in almost every case more durable, more reliable and less likely to fail than those that came before. This includes Harleys and other cruisers, which are highly engineered to meet their design parameters, which obviously do not include maximum speed and minimum weight, but do include high reliability, drivability and emission control. That said, I don't think that race replica bikes are ideal for street riding, though I wouldn't go so far as to say they are unsuitable. For many riders the low, narrow bars and hunched-over riding position are both uncomforatble and potentially dangerous because they compromise the rider's view of traffic and ability to handle the bike at low speed. And I personally don't see why anyone would need or even want a 120+ hp bike on the street, but that is really a matter of taste. However, I'm certain that the engineers who design today's bikes attempt to build in a good safety margin in every respect, though they may fail in some cases because engineering is still and always will be part art. There is no way to foresee every stress a machine might encounter in the real world. Engineering standards and practices are constantly advancing to reflect the knowledge gained from observing the performance of design changes.
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Old 06-02-2005, 04:34 AM   #47
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

I've never been impressed with the oil burning, diesel sounding, viby BMWs I've been around.



I've seen a couple of R1s with 100K+ miles and they still run like clockwork.
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Old 06-02-2005, 04:42 AM   #48
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Default Re: Hear hear.

I'll bet that you didn't hold much water for a while either when he was done with you.
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Old 06-02-2005, 04:58 AM   #49
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

I'll bet that the R100S owner had no trouble finding a replacement rear hub. How easy is it to get parts for a 24 year old KZ750?
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Old 06-02-2005, 05:03 AM   #50
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

Fortunately for the public at large I only dress up like Batgirl in the privacy of my home.
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