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Old 06-01-2005, 07:32 PM   #31
sportbikebandit
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Default Excellent Points.

Excellent points. Especially the maintenance schedule part. Note that the new Yamaha R-6 and Honda CBR due have a lot longer maintenance schedules than there predecessors. I have never had a problem with roll on with my 01 Ninja ZX-6R compared to cars. Now a V-Twin will probably beat it in a 20-30 mph roll on. No a naked like the Buell Lighting is probably has a great combination of safety (accident avoidence) attributes: Good low-end roll on, better vision for the rider due to the more upright seating postion. The only negative would be its higher purchase price. But that is probably offset by lower maintenance costs no costly valve checks right. Given this you have a strong agrument for the CityX. If it had ABS. I can't argue with ABS. It's great especially in wet climates like here in Seattle.
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Old 06-01-2005, 08:25 PM   #32
pdad13
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

Well, I certainly don't think the Daytona is over-engineered, but it was engineered enough to save my life on Memorial Day when the rear tire went bye-bye (thanks to a big metal fastener of some kind lying in the road) at about 60 mph in three lanes of traffic.



Nary a wobble as I negotiated though one of the most treacherous and busy merge areas on the Northern State Parkway (at the Meadowbrook Pkwy, for those who are familiar). Then, of course I hit a fairly sizeable breach in the pavement as I was moving through an on-ramp towards the shoulder with the flat tire screaming the whole way. A bit of a shake but nothing too bad. I'll take that stability over a few less pounds anyday.



Thanks to the NY State Trooper/R6 owner--who stopped to help.
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Old 06-02-2005, 12:48 AM   #33
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Default Re: Too close to the edge?

Airplane frames are made of aluminum and they seem to handle stress well. There was an airliner in service in Hawaii that lost a portion of its roof (and a flight attendent) due to the accumulated stress of frequent landings/takeoffs but that seems to be rare. There are still DC3s in service now repowered with fanjet engines. My guess is the broken frame was a QC issue rather than design. From what I could tell the frame structure itself had not failed.
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Old 06-02-2005, 01:28 AM   #34
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Default Re: Too close to the edge?

Actually, the British Aerospace Comet that I assume you are referening to losing a wing was no such thing-it suffered stress fractures from pressurization. The cracks started in the corners of the windows and propagated out from there to a total structual failure. This is why airliner windows in pressurized aircraft are now oval shaped vs windows with corners.



Still, the fatigue properties of aluminum are not conducive to long term survival with big amplitude vibration. Going back to the aircraft analogy, even non-pressurized aluminum aircraft have problems with stress fractures though not to the same extent. Note the wing spar failure problmes on the T-34 Mentor.
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Old 06-02-2005, 01:57 AM   #35
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

Actually, Batgirl had the motorcycle. As long as you don't ride like her, or especially dress like her while riding, then we'll give you a pass.
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Old 06-02-2005, 02:18 AM   #36
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

Bikes, unlike cars, don't have bizarre restrictions on their construction and thus we are free to choose from what amounts to a low-cycles sport bike, which these days is really just a race bike with a marginally de-tuned motor and without the 50K worth of suspension pieces that actual race bikes get, or a bike that will function reliably for 100K miles.



I personally like the variety available - and I like the semi-unlimited nature of high-end sport bikes. Granted, I have the likely overbuilt 1000RR and not the lunatic-fringe ZX-10. Nevertheless, the fact that our sport due primarily to regulatory considerations can function almost completely freely I think is fantastic.



If you want a more robust bike with sporting pretensions, you can always go down-market one level and buy what amounts to the bleeding edge bike from a few years ago, retaining some of the supposed structural integrity of their less developed designs.



I say: More! More! More!



Remember, with cars you can't have more, unless you drive a really old car or a kit car - you can only have more garbage that you don't want, like airbags, seat belts, mandated crash integrity etc. Only bikes give you the ability to say, I'm not going to crash so I don't need a force field to keep me from harm.



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Old 06-02-2005, 02:18 AM   #37
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Default Re: Hear hear.

Yes but it wasnt my fault it was the TV set that made me do it I was possessed by all that horrible violence and sex I was exposed to. Albiet this arguement didnt hold water with my pops either.
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Old 06-02-2005, 02:40 AM   #38
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

I thought the whole point of supersport bikes was to push the edge. I'm sure they are getting close to the engineering limits, but they find a way to make them faster and lighter every year. Quite a bit of the weight loss is by making them physically smaller. All the 1000 supersports, sans Honda, is at least a small, or smaller than a 600. A normal sized person has a hard time fitting on these bikes. Pretty soon we will have 200 hp pocketbikes! And I thought the bikes in the mid 80's were fast and crazy. Can't wait to see what the next generation will bring.
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Old 06-02-2005, 02:52 AM   #39
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Default Re: Too close to the edge?

I'll remember that the next time I fly and watch the wings waggle up and down.
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Old 06-02-2005, 03:08 AM   #40
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Default Re: Are modern sportbikes engineered too close to the edge?

The Daytona is one of the few bikes that I'd seriously consider. It seems to be liked (maybe secretly) by all that ride it, but it loses when compared against its contemporaires. But is it the best road going litre bike for most of us. More than likely. They need to updated it like they did with the ST, and then I think they'd have a lot of success with it for the reasons you just mentioned.
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