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Old 06-09-2004, 11:32 AM   #1
F451
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Default Maytag Man

"Is it supposed to sound like a 30-year-old Maytag?" What's wrong with Maytag now? They're suppose to last thirty years. Good old Erik just keeps putting out the hits in my book.
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Old 06-09-2004, 11:46 AM   #2
pdad13
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Default Re: Maytag Man

Okay, okay. How 'bout a 50-year-old Maytag?

It was making some weird noises, okay?



And the Maytag in my place can't be more than 10-years old and it's sounding pretty bad. Almost as bad as the XB sounded when I started it.
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Old 06-09-2004, 11:49 AM   #3
nokneedragin
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Default Re: You asked for it: My Buell experience.

Thanks for the review, real world and well written.

Sorry about the S. Fl. straight roads, been there, dun dat. The 7mile bridge is a cool ride.

Still sounds like a bit of a kludged together bike, but it does have the "don't see one every day" factor.
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Old 06-09-2004, 12:24 PM   #4
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Default Re: Maytag Man

I wouldn't be too concerned about being noticed for leaving half of your food uneaten at Denny's. I'll bet that happens more often that not. I liked your real world take on riding a new and strange motorcycle. It's something that is often lacking in print mag. reviews. VWW
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Old 06-09-2004, 01:07 PM   #5
pated
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Default Re: You asked for it: My Buell experience.

That was the best review I have read in over a year. It was all about the bike. Great job.
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Old 06-09-2004, 01:08 PM   #6
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Default Re: You asked for it: My Buell experience.

Thanks for a real world article. It's hard to filter the bias that seems to seep into XB reviews. I ride a 95 MZ Skorpion Sport - it confuses the hell out of most people. Most riders coming from a 600-whatever sportbike can't get past my redline is about where they start to slip out the clutch. It's all what you're used to. Don't try something different..you might like it.
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Old 06-09-2004, 02:51 PM   #7
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Default Buell Comfort?

Nice story! I was down that way on a 1993 K11RS a few years ago for the Gator Rally in Marathon, Fl. I rode the 1000 plus miles from Baton Rouge in a day and a half on that bike for the two day rally and then back the other direction the same distance in a day and a half. I have to say comparing the Buell to a Sportster and a Victory in terms of comfort on a massive 200 mile ride at best, ooops sorry, that would be 400 miles round trip, leaves me wondering. I love that Buell, and have considered buying one, possibly soon, but I would need a lot more than laser straight roads and blue water to keep me happy whilst riding it.
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Old 06-09-2004, 03:12 PM   #8
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Default Re: Buell Comfort?

Like I said, results may vary. I was prepared for an unbearable torture rack. The fact that it wasn't exceptionally painful was quite surprising. Don't think I meant that it was like riding a Gold Wing, just far more comfortable than I ever would have expected. After some of the things I read about the Firebolt's ergos, I thought I'd be in traction for a week. I felt fine.



And I don't think I'm even nuts enough to attempt to ride it for 1000 miles a clip. I think a 200 mile ride is more than enough for this type of bike.



I also agree that you really need some twisty roads to really appreciate the Bolt. While I was on it I was thinking what a shame it was that I couldn't bring it somewhere more appropriate to sample its charms.
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Old 06-09-2004, 03:19 PM   #9
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Default Re: You asked for it: My Buell experience.

I've always liked the looks of the XB series. More than that though, I liked this writeup. It is stuff like this that makes my subscription worthwile. Great writing (I laughed out loud in a few spots), and a real world opinion, not just a bunch of numbers and graphs.



Thanks to pdad for the info, and thanks to MO for posting it!
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Old 06-09-2004, 05:10 PM   #10
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Default Re: You asked for it: My Buell experience.

Very pleased to see a real world description like this. Mirrors my own experiences for the first few days of my ownership. I had had many Japanese bikes, mostly Yamahas, and was looking for something other than being a member of the R1 army again. So, made in the USA patriotism, and temporary insanity caused me to make this choice.



I'm glad I did, I may never go back. It turns out that this bike's torque and handling more than make up for any of the technical disadvantages I found when compared to my previously owned masterpieces. And the "WTF is that?" factor is unbeatable. All it needed was some finish work, which, at the price they are selling for shouldn't be needed, but who buys anything and leaves it stock anyway?



First thing done, adjust the suspension. You should have heard the puzzled inquiries about this process from the Harley owners on the dealer floor, "You can adjust the suspension? Why?".



Second things done were cosmetic changes. All the cheesy stickers and warnings were tossed. The heel guards and pegs were changed for more color coordinated pieces (black). Passenger pegs removed.



Third, synthetic oils for the engine and transmission. Although I had almost no trouble with my transmission, the synthetic oil did improve tranny feel. And that hot air cooled V-twin is a torch for lesser oils.



Fourth, changed all the lighting to high intensity LEDs, headlights to Raybrig.



Fifth, the big equalizer. The installation of the race kit, "Not For Street Use". The race muffler does away with the "variable valve technology" (read polution control), and drops five pounds in the process, the intake kit opens up the airbox flow and uses a K&N filter, and the race ECM comes with a high performance fuel map, and is reprogrammable to optimize dyno tuning ...by any H-D dealer with a dyno. Even without dyno tuning, power, torque, and sound all increased and improved dramatically. More dramatically than modifications like these did for my previous bikes. That made the difference needed for the road.



Granted, these things did add another 1400$ in cost, not including my highly skilled labor, and one could argue that the higher price of the Buell should include them. And granted, the Engine Control Modual is only accessable by proprietary dealer software and pc interfaces. But modifications like these are often considered part of the ownership process of many bikes, and the H-D dealerships are often very cooperative in helping you get the additional costs covered by whatever financing you might have. I was aware of the need for the extra work going in, so for me, it was a very rewarding process. And is still rewarding every time I ride. Tires next.
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