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Old 03-10-2003, 12:20 PM   #41
Z3Coupe
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Default Re: EBoz

AMA already has a 1000cc class - Formula Extreme... I agree - especially now that Superbikes aren't even 750cc anymore, this class is redundant. Keep 250GP and axe Superstock instead?



Matthew
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Old 03-10-2003, 12:38 PM   #42
rsheidler
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Default 750 SuperStock

True. However Formula Extreme allows almost wide-open modifications, while SuperStock is for close to stock bikes. With the 1-liter 4s now allowed in Superbike, it seems to me that maybe Formula Extreme is the redudant class.



I really love the 250 GPs and was one of the strong critics of the AMA decision to terminate the class, but unless there is closer racing than I saw at Daytona, I can understand the desire to move it to a different sanctioning body. Sorenson and Oliver are so far ahead of everyone else that the third place guy was in a different time zone.



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Old 03-10-2003, 12:49 PM   #43
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Default Golly I missed all the fun!

In stead of watching it on MO I watched and taped it in real time on SpeedTV.



It was a great race all right. All the Superbikes were scary in the infield with those ceramic tires they need to withstand the banking Gs. How they stand the bashing they get from the rough parts of the banked turns is a wonder. The announcers mentioned that Duhamel found a smooth path through turn one. Go figure.
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Old 03-10-2003, 01:53 PM   #44
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Default Re: V-Twin revival yeah right? It's still early boys.

So what you're saying is the V-Twin isn't obsolete, it just doesn't sell well?
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Old 03-10-2003, 01:57 PM   #45
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Default Re: V-Twin revival yeah right? It's still early boys.

Remind them how much longer this race is compared to the rest of the season while your at it.
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Old 03-10-2003, 02:04 PM   #46
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Default Excellent Point the race length did favor...

Great point willpower33. The Twins are easier on tires, I wonder if that advantage will disappear once we go to the normal races...
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Old 03-10-2003, 02:07 PM   #47
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Default 250 GP very cost effective

I have fantazed about buying a old 250 GP bike just to use on the track. i..e where wil this series go to? Formula USA ???
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Old 03-10-2003, 02:10 PM   #48
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Default Re: V-Twin revival yeah right? It's still early boys.

No it's obsolete for racing as well. The V-Twin can't handle the high revs which will be needed eventually i.e. MotoGP (Ducati went to the V-4) and the asymetric layout makes exhaust tuning tougher etc.
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Old 03-10-2003, 02:32 PM   #49
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Default Re: 250 GP very cost effective

Virtually every club racing organization has several classes where the 250 GPs can race competitively -- I am sure, for example that both WMRRA and OMRRA race them.



For a national series, I have heard of WERA or CCS being suggested.



The down side of running a 2-stroke GP bike is that they are realtively maintenance intensive -- and are very sensitive to changes in temperature, barametric pressure, humidity etc (and if you get your jetting wrong, you just might find your engine seized up suddenly at 130mph!



The good news is that while maintenance is required fairly frequently, it is pretty easy and inexpensive.
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Old 03-10-2003, 02:51 PM   #50
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Default Re: Excellent Point the race length did favor...

True, although the other races don't normally include pit stops, so the tires are in similar condition by the end as they are shortly before pit stops at Daytona. The bigger issue is that the impact of the banking places strange demands on the tires -- gotta have really hard rubber on one side to hold up on the banking, and soft on the other. The sustained high speeds on the banking are a unique issue with Daytona.



By the way, back in 1975, Barry Sheene, who died today if cancer, had a horrific crash at Daytona when his rear tire shredded and wedged in the swingarm at 170 mph on the banking! So, you don't want to push things too far there!



Riding style has as much, or more to do with tire management as bike type. And it is not always what it seems. There are several riders in GP who visably slide more than the others but seem to get very good wear. McWilliams is a good example -- rides it like a flattracker, but gets good wear.



A rider/bike combo that gets better wear can get away with running a softer compound tire and still make it last -- that is one of Barros' strength -- he almost always runs a softer compound than anyone else, which is one of the reasons he can often outbrake other riders late in the race.



It was interesting that everyone predicted that Yates would shred his tires in the 200 due to his riding style, but he did just fine, while Mlading was the one with tire problems.
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