Don’t know about you, but one of my favorite ways to attempt to keep my personal bore-to-stroke ratio reasonably undersquare is to pedal around on my bicycle, and I know I am not alone. Many motorcyclists are also big on bicycling, which makes Yamaha’s entry into the US e-bike industry kind of a big deal. Correct, they’re not motorcycles, but we think we like Yamaha’s new e-Bikes anyway. It announced four new models this morning at the big Interbike show:

UrbanRush, balance of power, stiffness, and speed in a sleek road bike chassis.

YDX-TORC, agile XC mountain bike with aggressive performance and fastest response.

CrossCore, fitness hybrid design for efficiency and ergonomic comfort.

CrossConnect, everyday recreation-utility for those that want to take their gear with them.

Here’s the Official Press Release:

CYPRESS, Calif. –September 20, 2017–

Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, (YMUS) today unveiled its all-new power assist electric bicycle (e-Bike) prototype models. Yamaha’s power assist bicycle product line is scheduled to be available at U.S. dealers starting in 2018. Yamaha will enter the U.S. bicycle market with Power Assist Bicycles designed by Yamaha for new cyclists and cycling enthusiasts seeking alternative commuting options, a fun and casual weekend cycling adventure or a thrilling new off-road experience.

“Yamaha has been a pioneer, inventor, and innovator in electric bicycles for more than two decades,” said Terry Okawa, President, Yamaha Motor Corp., U.S.A. “And introducing Yamaha electric bicycles at this time will only add further to the depth and diversity of the Yamaha brand in the U.S.”

Yamaha Motor Company, Ltd. (YMC) launched the world’s first electrically power assisted bicycle in1993 and has since produced more than 4 million drive units and sold over 2 million Yamaha power assist bicycles. YMC supplies class-leading e-Bike Systems to select OEM partners worldwide.

“Yamaha is excited to share our passion for power assist bicycles with riders seeking that next new adventure,” said Rob Trester, Division Manager, New Business Development Division, which is launching the Yamaha Power Assist Bicycles brand. The initial prototype models were unveiled this morning at Interbike, the largest bicycle trade event in North America. Yamaha is actively identifying and establishing new relationships with specific retailers currently servicing e-Bike consumers.

“e-Bikes have created a universal re-awakening of bicycling in the U.S. and people that might have otherwise dismissed the idea of riding a traditional bike are now finding an alternative solution. That is exciting news for bicycle retail stores and they are quickly embracing the opportunity to help new customers,” said Drew Engelmann, Sales and Marketing Manager, New Business Development Division, which is launching the Yamaha Power Assist Bicycles brand.

Yamaha Power Assist bicycles provide a natural assist feel powered by drive units that have undergone constant evolution through decades of engineering and innovation based on customer feedback. Yamaha’s Triple Sensor System found in PWseries and PW-X system incorporates frictionless sensors that measure the rider’s pedal-torque, bicycle speed and crank arm cadence in real-time with tremendous precision. This design results in a drive unit that provides one of the most refined and natural rides available. Interbike has awarded the PW-X motor with a “2017 Interbike Electric Product Innovation Award,” which will be on display for the duration of the tradeshow among winners in other categories.

yamahabicycles.com

  • Old MOron

    I used to ride my bicycle to work. Every day I would tell myself, “THIS time I’m going to take it easy.” But I always sweat my clothes at least a little bit. Maybe one of these ebikes is the ticket.

    • 12er

      seeing more and more around SF lately.

  • Jordan Andrew

    Looks cool, but doesn’t this defeat the purpose of riding a bicycle?

    • SerSamsquamsh

      The purpose of a bicycle is to efficiently transport yourself. Exercise is a great side benefit. Except if you are in a suit on work way to work and don’t want to show up drenched in sweat.

      These are definitely the best looking ebikes I’ve ever seen.

    • Kenneth

      You still must pedal – the harder you pedal, the faster you go – but the motor adds assistance, allowing much higher speeds and distance for the same effort (especially uphill or against the wind) than most non-fanatics can hope to attain. Properly promoted, this should get many people out of their cars.

    • Jon Neet

      Not really. IN my case, I blew out my right knee a bit over a year ago. I can’t ride a regular bike any more. But, with an ebike, using the pedal assist mode, I believe that, not only could I ride one, but, in that mode, I would get the maximum range. Many ebikes have a twist throttle much like a motorcycle. But, when you ride it in throttle mode without pedaling, you get the shortest range. In pedal assist mode, it give you much smaller amounts of electric motor power. If you are going down hill, or pedaling harder on flat ground, you get little to no electric assist. If your speed drops below a certain point while pedaling, the motor begins to assist you.
      If my right knee can just take a bit of the load pedaling, then I might be able to ride an ebike. The ride I want to be able to do would require maybe a 30 mile range. But, if I did run out of juice towards the end, at least it’s pretty flat.
      Anyway, before I blew out my knee I was riding a single speed “fixie” style bike, and could do this ride. So, for now, if I want to ride a bicycle, it’s going to have to be an ebike.

      • Kenneth

        Most – like these Yamahas – have no throttle. You choose a power assist setting, then the motor adds the pre-determined amount of additional assist depending only on how hard you’re pedaling. It isn’t directly related to the bicycle’s speed.

    • HazardtoMyself

      Guess it depends who you ask.

      Professional cyclists seen to like them. Only complaint I see from them on these is the motor is not hidden in the frame.

      Yamaha needs to shrink and hide this motor better. They can then be the official sponser of road racers worldwide.

  • Jon Neet

    If Yamaha is getting into ebikes in the US, I am sure they will do it up right. You can get a decent ebike now for around $1000. Range is increasing. They tend to keep the speeds down, as if you make them to run too fast you may find them not rated as a bicycle any more. They usually give a low range to high range span. You get the least range when riding it like a motorcycle using just the throttle (though they do not all have throttles), and the most range when using a pedal assist setting on the lowest setting (equals using the least amount of motor). You’ll see ranges like 20-35 miles. Some are getting the higher number up to 60 to 80 miles. That’s getting up there for a bike. Another way would be to carry an extra fully charged battery. That will double your range.

  • sgray44444

    I have a weak heart and as a consequence get easily winded. I wonder if something like this could help me get into better condition without overdoing it and ending up in bed for a couple of days.