And now for my next complaint. The topic keeps coming up: Why aren’t more people buying motorcycles? When applied to Millennials, we conjectured a few Whatevers ago – after minutes of careful thought and some research including opening our eyeballs – that they’re not buying more motorcycles because they have no money. I’ll add to that today: In addition to not having any money, riders are also not buying more motorcycles because they simply have no damn time to ride them.

Is it because they’re all playing video games all day? No. It’s because those who are working enough to afford a new motorcycle are working more than ever. (I exclude anyone who is working two jobs but still can’t afford a new motorcycle.) If the sacred millennial every seller of goods wants to attract has his or her face buried in their “handheld device,” it’s more likely because they’re working than because they’re playing Angry Birds. This is the first generation that grew up with the cell phone, and therefore the first without the option of clocking out at 5.

Photo by themotolady

From this Harvard Business Review article, we get the phrase “work martyr,” and the theory that millennials identify themselves as such more than any other age cohort. It’s the atavistic pattern from my Depression-era parents repeating itself: “The first Millennials came of working age amid the wreckage of the dot-com bubble, and many younger Millennials were searching for jobs during the Great Recession. In other words, to Millennials, a weak economy is the norm. Since this generation also faces historically high levels of student debt, it makes a certain amount of sense that they wouldn’t want to jeopardize their jobs.”

The Harvard Business Review article also introduced me to “vacation shaming.” Vacation time doesn’t follow economic cycles, but it does show a marked decrease with the rise of the internet. The important take-away here, kids, is people who take all their vacation days are more likely to get raises and bonuses. Try to seem less needy and desperate.

People don’t just have that sense of insecurity for no reason. I stumbled upon “All Work and No Pay: The Great American Speed-up” in the left-leaning but right-on-the-money Mother Jones: “To understand how we got here, first let’s consider the Ben Franklin-Horatio Alger-Henry Ford ur-myth: To balk at working hard—really, really hard—brands you as profoundly un-American. Who besides the archetypical Japanese salaryman derives so much of his self-image from self-sacrifice on the job? Slacker is one of the most biting insults available in polite company.”

The good news is U.S. productivity is way up! The bad news is it’s not really benefiting most of the worker bees, many of whom are squeezing more honey out of the same pollen – and it certainly doesn’t seem to be benefiting the U.S. motorcycle market.

I bring this all up also because I think this is the first month I can remember when I really haven’t been on at least one good, fog-clearing butt-clenching extended motorcycle blast since my last column four weeks ago, wherein I was able to go on about our big four-bike super-naked shootout (which should be posted soon) and contemplate Death.

In the ’60s, we had time for twice as much fun. Photo by themotolady

Motorcycle sales are down again through 3Q of 2017, but I wouldn’t say, like some observers, that it’s the manufacturer’s’ fault for not coming up with new models to lure buyers in; in fact that’s preposterous. There’s been a veritable avalanche of new models across the entire motorcycling price gamut, with truly great models from the $5k new KTM Duke 390 for penurious youth to an all-new Gold Wing, and everything in between including such choice morsels as a new six-cylinder BMW bagger, eight (8!) new H-D Softails, a slew of Ducati Scramblers and your choice of RSV4 Aprilia superbikes that’ll knock your socks off around a racetrack, then let you ride home with the cruise control set. Maybe you’re holding out for a new Husqvarna Vitpilen or Indian FTR750 Street? (I made that last one up, but you know something’s coming.) The smorgasbord is spread as never before.

The Husqvarna Vitpilen which I won’t be riding anytime soon, if ever.

When I think of the boring old formulaic stuff we rode in the old days, when business was booming and the big OEMs really had little incentive to innovate, I feel a little sorry for all the Conestoga wagons I wrote glowing reviews of.

The downside of this fall’s explosion of new models is that I now spend more time sitting on my patio writing about first looks of new bikes than I do actually riding them; In case you hadn’t noticed, we’re posting a lot more content on MO lately.

One of those nearly innumerable recent MO stories, talks about bike sales being also down in Europe by 5.1% for the first nine months of 2017. But wait! Motorcycle sales are actually up by 6.4% in Italy and by 2.4% in France. Those two are Europe’s two slackerest big countries, and the frequent butts of uncounted socialism slams. According to Wikipedia, they work 1,730 hours per year in Italy to the U.S.’s 1,783, and in France they have chilled it down to working just 1,472 hours per year. Pass the vin rouge, mon ami…. So what the economy’s crumbling? At least the Italians and Frogs have time to go for a nice ride on a new bike. And never mind that the Germans, working a mere 1,363 hours, had their new-bike market tank 11.7% so far this year; they’re the exception that proves the rule. And, 64% of all statistics are made up by people like me. (As an ironic aside, Mexicans actually do lead the not-slackers race, working a crushing average of 2,228 hours per year.)

Okay, well, sorry I don’t have a better Whatever for today, but I’ve got a helluva lot to do before heading off to the big international EICMA show in Milan on Sunday, where I’ll spend three days traipsing about a huge, 3,710,000-square foot convention hall with a million other motojournalists to bring you the scoops on approximately 9,746 new motorcycles. How many of them will I be riding while I’m in Milan, you ask? Zero. None. Neechevo. Nada.

Whatever. I can’t wait.

  • allworld

    This is all good, but Piaggio needs to put the brakes on and answer the question “why do so many dealerships refuse to do business with them”?

  • JWaller

    Glad I left the private sector for teaching. I’ll never be rich, but I’ll have more time to enjoy the little fruits of my labor which means plenty of time riding older bikes that I have to maintain myself because I can’t afford to have someone else to do it. And no, I’m not complaining a bit.

    • Born to Ride

      Sometimes I wish I had pursued petroleum engineering. This guys work 6 months a year, bank nearly twice what I will be making mid career with a good job, and suffer through way less vector dynamics classes…

      • Rocky Stonepebble

        What did you take?

        • DickRuble

          He took the quick exit from law school..

        • Born to Ride

          Mechanical enginerding

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            Bio-chemistry, for me.

            That is why I asked.

          • Born to Ride

            Yeah I took a look at my buddy’s O-chem homework once, that killed my early biotechnology curiosities. “Bring on the calculus!” I think was my verbatim response.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            LOL … Calculus and Linear Algebra were two of my electives.

            I only took chemistry courses (to be honest), to apply to med school.

            I had a member of provincial parliament as a referee, and exam results after days of ‘socializing’ to back me up.

            Was not accepted (thank gosh). Continued with chemistry, of which I do not practice. I’m considered an electrical boffin amongst my co-workers. Do a lot of yadda yadda that is rubbered.

          • Alaskan18724

            Ha. Linguist here. Laughing at “yadda yadda that is rubbered.”

          • Alaskan18724

            Who also took chemistry courses to apply to med school, with similar results.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            You went on a three day bender with your frat brothers three days before your organic chemistry final too?

          • Alaskan18724

            Different vector. Involved girlfriend. Ended up at the same destination….

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            The washroom of the Bloor Street “Swiss Chalet”, barfing your guts out?

          • Alaskan18724

            Yeah. Well, actually the late War Eagle Supper Club. And actually afterward. Similar outcome. My O Chem performance lived up to no one’s

          • Alaskan18724

            Expectations—except, perhaps, my professor’s. Then again, he was in a position to make his predictions a reality. No bitterness.

          • Douglas

            P chem is worse….right there with 3d yr music theory.

        • Rick Soloway

          Very witty dialog guys (Rocky and Alaskan)! Have you considered forming a comedy writing team?

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            LOL! Like Hale and Pace, or more like Bob and Ray?

          • Rick Soloway

            Key and Peel?

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            I thought to suggest Penn and Teller, but worried that may be too subtle.

  • John B.

    I have a motorcycle in my garage, and I ride it. I have no idea what other people are up to.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      Are you a millenial?

      • John B.

        No. I’m conservative on economic issues, liberal (but not progressive) on social issues and free speech, and civil libertarian on everything else.

        • What’s the distinction between Liberal and Progressive?

          • Alaskan18724

            Classical liberalism was pretty much what Republicans espoused pre-now. Progressivism is pretty much what Democrats currently espouse. In America, the Republicans were the original liberals. N’est-ce pas?

          • Alaskan18724

            Why, oh, why, did I even go there? Slap my jowls.

          • Gabriel Owens

            Yes, the Democrats haven’t been this mad since we took away their slaves.

          • Alaskan18724

            Hah. Slap yours, too….

          • Jim L

            They still fly the stars and bars though and switched parties. Their narrative doesn’t match reality. One, they lost, two, there’s no clean end of that turd of owning people. Trying to justify it is a mess at best.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            I own people. Four of them. Can’t wait ’til they move out. Maybe I can afford multiple bikes again.

          • Born to Ride

            No sympathy for self inflicted wounds. I’d make each one buy me a bike when they get their first job.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            Right … I’m still paying for the University education of ALL four of them!

            The day they pay me back, insurance rates shall drop to a dollar a month, Suzuki shall reprise the Gamma, and monkeys will skoosh oot my arse.

            Sorry. Was going through retirement options when I read this. One is Scotland. I sometimes revert to my first language. lol

          • Rick Soloway

            LOL!

          • Alaskan18724

            “There we were, surrounded by children of our own making; a seemingly innocuous habit that had somehow gotten out of hand.”
            –Patrick F. McManus

          • Rick Soloway

            LOL! I haven’t had so much fun reading a comments section since forever!

          • Gabriel Owens

            Yes I guess the Democrats were still flying the stars and bars when they started the KKK in order to extort votes from black southerners.

          • Jim L

            Before that and way after too, even after they switched parties.

          • Jim L

            The GOP IS NOT classical liberal. Really, they are what I call right wing progressives. Progressives want to use the power and money of the government to foment and execute their agendas. In the case of left wing progressives, it’s about social justice and “equality”, which is usually the government telling people how to behave and taking people’s money and giving it to someone else. For right wing progressives it’s about making the world safe for democracy and supplant governments with propped up puppetships that are favorable to our corporations. Aligned with the latter are social conservatives that have their own domestic agenda that is counter to “social justice”. A classical liberal doesn’t want the government in our lives at home or abroad in terms of authority and military. Liberal and progressive are not the same thing, they are just used interchangeably by people that are ignorant to the meaning of the words. Yes, the GOP were progressives in the left wing sense at one time. Now they’ve switched to a NeoCon mixed with SoCon agenda.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            I’m a rocker.

          • Alaskan18724

            Thus, pre-now….

          • JMDGT

            One is a socialist. One is a communist.

          • Alaskan18724

            I wasn’t a hippy when hippies were cool. I think I may be a hippy now. Or a cowboy. Are there hippy cowboys?

          • Campisi

            Yepperoni! They call them hipsters.

            Sorry.

          • Alaskan18724

            Well, crap.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            There is Kinky Friedman.

          • Alaskan18724

            There is….Vote for Kinky!

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            Sadly, we may not quote Kinky here. Even I get offended! lol

          • John B.

            No one appointed me the arbiter of what attributes define Liberalism and Progressivism, but I can explain some of the distinctions in my mind.

            With respect to First Amendment free speech for example, traditional liberalism would not countenance a prohibition on so-called hate speech. Liberalism (liberals) defended the Nazi’s right to march in Skokie, Illinois, and in other places where a given message is especially offensive. Progressivism embraces limitations on speech they oppose such as when Conservative speakers come to places like Berkeley. Liberals defend the rights of those with opposing views to speak, and have continued to do so on college campuses and elsewhere, while progressives have sought to stifle free speech.

            Similarly, Liberalism embraces equal protection under the law. Whereas, Progressivism seeks preferential treatment for certain groups at the expense of others, which offends the traditional notions of equal protection liberalism embraces.

            Another example would be private property ownership. Classic Liberalism seeks to defend the right to own property, and to allow a person great latitude with respect to what they do on their own property. Progressivism has a collectivist view of property and other resources, and seeks reparations for lands seized from native people.

            Traditionally, Liberals sought to extend the rights in the Bill of Rights to all citizens, and to defend the rights contained in the Bill of Rights. Progressives view the Constitution and Amendments as antiquated, and an obstacle to what they view as progress.

            That’s about all I can give you in a comment.

          • Very interesting! Thanks.

          • Born to Ride

            Couldn’t have said it better myself. But you’re far more eloquent than I, even on my best day, so that’s to be expected.

          • John B.

            Thank you for the compliment, but don’t sell yourself short.

          • Rick Soloway

            With all the power vested in me, I hereby appoint you the arbiter of what attributes define Liberalism and Progressivism. I also concur 100% with your self described political views.

          • John B.

            Thank You!!! This IS good news!!!

          • Tinwoods

            Glad you covered yourself by saying you’re explaining some of the distinctions in your own mind because much of what you wrote is indeed in your own mind.

          • John B.

            I was asked to explain a distinction I made, and made an honest attempt to do so. That said, I find progressivism and most progressives intolerable. In contrast, liberalism has many virtues.

    • SerSamsquamsh

      I have a motorcycle in my garage. There is an inconvenient amount of snow and ice outside however.

      • John B.

        Sunny and a high of 91 degrees today in Big D. Too warm really, but I don’t ever miss the ice and snow much.

        • SerSamsquamsh

          I definitely miss living in Dallas right about this time of year 🙁

      • Born to Ride

        You have my pity sir. Why don’t you have one of those snow bikes? That’s the first thing I would buy if I moved to a god forsaken place with seasons… bleh.

        • SerSamsquamsh

          Maybe I should look into that:)

    • Born to Ride

      I work 6 days a week and I have 3, 5 including my dirt bikes. I find time to ride, usually to and from work/school. But riding is riding.

  • Gabriel Owens

    I like to work 50+ hours a week. But anything over 60-65 hours and im no fun to be around thats for sure.

  • Alaskan18724

    JB. Outstanding. Seriously. You used slackerest in a sentence. We’re not worthy.

    Oh—and you gave us most everything we need to know about economics in one brief rant.

    Outstanding.

    • Rick Soloway

      I concur. I logged in to write a comment to Mr. Burns. I’ve been reading him for years in various motorcycle publications, and he can be counted on to entertain while enlightening his readers. Great article JB and good use of your patio!.

  • JMDGT

    We live in the best of times when it comes to motorcycling. The bikes are so much better than they used to be. It would be nice to get a new bike every couple of years. I consider owning one a luxury. One I have always been willing to pay for. Today there are so many good used bikes out there that may be the way to go. Pay cash if you can. If you need more money work more.

    • Larry Kahn

      Used bikes- I have a Ducati Sport Classic, 650 V-Strom and a 2007 Bonneville. Less than $10K in all three. Bought used/light damage over a few year time span. Some nice new stuff out there but not $13-20K better than what I have. Just saying you’re right!

      • Born to Ride

        How did you score a sport classic for less than $10k? And do you want to sell it for what you paid for it?

        • Larry Kahn

          Jesus loves me and no.

      • HeDidn’tWeDid

        There used to be a BMW/Triumph/Ducati dealer here in Little Rock. Sadly, those 3 marquees are absent from the Little Rock motorcycling scene now. However, whenever I got my Triumph Sprint 1050 serviced, they would let me use a Ducati Sport Classic as a loaner. In fact, in 2010, I almost bought said loaner for 7K. But I passed, like a fool passing on a bank robbery, and bought a very gently used Daytona 675 SE. Hindsight….and all that.

  • hipsabad

    it’s ok, John, some of us got really good at reading between the lines of all those Conestoga wagons you guys wrote glowing reviews of–it was necessary for our survival

    • john burns

      nah, I mean they really were good at the time, but there’s so much more variety now it’s crazy.

      • Alaskan18724

        Rotary phones used to be all the rage. Count the clicks.

        • Douglas

          I’d be all for bringing back rotaries (as the only option for phones) and having a text provision on the mobiles…..then the ninnies would HAVE to pull over to “stay connected”. Might stop some really egocentric, dangerous driving habits….

      • Douglas

        Same w/cars, TV’s, flashlites, computers, vacuum cleaners….autopistols, power tools, microwaves….the list goes on.

  • Buzz

    If you talk to parents these days, the kids aren’t even interested in having Driver’s Licenses let alone motorcycles. I know so many parents who have 18 year old kids who still don’t drive.

    I got my license the day after I turned 16. I had a job before that and can count maybe one week unemployed in my entire life.

    I’ve got one spawn almost 20. Doesn’t have 10% of the drive I did. Talks a good game. Gets more a$$ than a public toilet seat. Yeah I’m jealous. But I have three motorcycles.

    • john burns

      the recessive moto gene will always out, though. For every one like yours, there’s one born to two accountants who drive Dodge Caravans. Why has this happened to us, they wail?

      • Alaskan18724

        I’m lucky. My eldest inherited the motorcycle gene, but he got a financial gene from some itinerant visitor. He’s made money off of every motorcycle he’s ever bought, and he buys them all the freaking time. Cool ones, too. I buy one I like and ride it for ten years. He buys ten a year. Well, maybe not ten, but we did have a Bonneville Black, a Speed Triple, and a ZRX in the garage, all at the same time. Aside from my assortment of Harleys, Hondas, and Aprilias (scooters, not Tuonos, dadgummit it). Somewhere in that time frame were also Sportsters, KLRs, and a pair of asphalt black 919s. A Victory SC92. I don’t know what all. Dang. I’m living vicariously through my kid….

    • Alaskan18724

      Lived that adventure at my house, too. Finally had to insist on visits to the DMV in order to preserve domestic tranquility.

    • Born to Ride

      Given the choice between riding women and riding bikes, I’ve found the women will generally wait their turn. You’re doing alright.

  • HazardtoMyself

    I say it is the manufacturers fault. They are releasing too many new and interesting models.

    I bought a new street bike last year, but also sold my dirt bike due to lack of time to haul it out to the trails. Even though I didn’t use it nearly enough, I still miss it.

    A week after selling it I started looking for a dual sport / adventure model. Figure if I don’t have to tow one somewhere for off road riding, then maybe I will get more use out of it.

    There are just too many to choose from and what seems like new models coming out every few months. I just can’t make up my mind, big, small, medium, new or used, more road or off road purposed. Used DR650, KLR, DRZ, new Africa Twin, heavily discounted 2015 1190, versys 300 or 650, desert sled, CRF rally, GS310 or 650, KLX250 and the list goes on. Too many choices, and every time I’m close a new model is about to be released.

    Damn them for giving us too many choices.

    • Born to Ride

      Desert sled. This is the bike you are looking for.

      • 12er

        I sat on one and got a tingly sensation.

        • Born to Ride

          That sensation is called lust. It occurs when your body attempts to tell your brain that you need to mount something and take it for a ride. It can be felt for a myriad of objects, most traditionally for internal combustion females… er… something to that effect.

      • HazardtoMyself

        The sled is the one that calls out to me in my dreams.

        I don’t know if I am worthy enough for her though.

        If I’m being honest with myself wild dreams of screaming through back roads, open fields and deserts will most likely turn into occasional fire road runs on the way home from work right now. Logic brain then kicks in and says buy a used KLR or DRZ for under $3k.

        Maybe I’m just holding out hope one of the big 4 will announce an updated middleweight true dual sport at EICMA.

        • Gruf Rude

          I’ve done bucket list rides like the White Rim Trail and solo to Alaska on a KLR – really can’t get a better value for a true ADV bike.

        • Born to Ride

          Tenere 700, it’s coming one day. It’s the only reason Im not hounding dealers to give me an unfair deal on the sled.

  • Tod Rafferty

    I have the time if you have the rides.

  • Jim L

    The iGeneration doesn’t value the independence and freedom of vehicle ownership in general. They see it as a liability. I wonder if being chauffeured around by velcro parents factors in? Also, they are more interested in the virtual than the real reality. I think we’ve had a paradigm shift culturally that may be independent of economics.

    • Born to Ride

      Thank you for the new term, I hadn’t heard iGen until now. I feel as though millenial is too broadly used when people in their late 20s and early 30s that remember a time before internet and probably didn’t have a cell phone until high school or even after are lumped in with 18-19-20 year olds that have been handling touch screens since before puberty.

      • Jim L

        I have 5 of them, 12-22.

  • blansky

    I think sometimes we pay too much attention to financial quarterly reports and the sky is falling media. I really don’t care what HD and BMW are doing this quarter.

    Things are cyclical, there are trends. Perhaps all the kids of millennials or iGens or whatever, will rebel against the computer and become Hells Angels. Who knows.

    The other problem may be helicopter parents who don’t have time to ride because they’re too busy micro managing their kids free time.

    Whatever. I stopped riding when I was 24 and started again 40 years later. Bet the geniuses that predict everything didn’t see that coming. And neither did I.

    • john burns

      totally agree, yet tracking stuff like this keeps a lot of us off the streets.

      • Alaskan18724

        It’s kinda interesting. And it explains a lot, for those of us who like being explained to.

  • Scott650

    I’m 56 years old. Been riding since my early teens, on and off road. Over the last 4-5 years I’ve ridden fewer and fewer miles. Primary reason? Fear. Plain, simple fear. Between obviously distracted drivers focused on ANYTHING but driving, blatantly lousy older (and younger!) drivers , drivers (and riders ) who rampantly disregard even the basic traffic laws (rolling stop signs, running red lights, unsafe passing, excessive speed on surface streets and in congested traffic), and the threat from evidently sociopathic drivers/riders with little apparent regard for their own lives much less anyone else’s, I can’t justify the risk versus rewards of riding. I’d rather put on my trail shoes and put in 3-6 miles in the woods than get one of the bikes or scooters out. I’m considering a dirt-only bike and a trailer and just staying off the roads all together. But I completely understand if anyone rejects motorcycling due to what they have to deal with on the street.

    • Rocky Stonepebble

      I live in Canada. We have universal health care. I fear nothing! LOL

      Actually, I ride like an old woman, because OHIP does not cover bike damage.

      • Alaskan18724

        I just ride like an old woman because I’m afraid….

        • Rocky Stonepebble

          Liquid courage. Four or five coffees!

  • DickRuble

    “999,000 of who desperately”.. of whom, Burns.. 999,000 of whom…

    • Born to Ride

      …and that’s why we love you Dick.

      • john burns

        no problem, looks like somebody edited that part out anyway. god knows why?

  • Oh sweet! You’re gonna ride a Zero in Milan?!? Might I suggest my personal favorite, the 2018 FXS? A more perfect urban assault vehicle does not exist. Energica may try to convince you otherwise, but trust me on this one. 😉

    You’re right about kids these days, though. The craziest thing about them is- even though they’re overworked and underpaid, the brats won’t go into debt to finance their fantasy life like my generation (x) has! So yeah, luxury toys are floundering. But I see plenty of kids in LA on cheap scooters & motorcycles these days. Apparently they’re finally sick of sitting in traffic in the most congested city on Earth. Enough so to ignore the wealth of uninformed bullshit about how dangerous motorcycles are.

    What we experienced motorcyclists and journalists need to do is explain how many miles we’ve ridden without incident, and how we did it. And make that more exciting to hear about than some gruesome crash. 😉

  • kenneth_moore

    I think you’re right. Spending on toys like bikes (not counting the .001% purchased for primary transportation) takes disposable income. Most people I know who were doing fine in the 80s to 2000s are now happy to be holding even. Blame who you want, the net effect is a very few are getting much wealthier and the vast majority are either static or declining financially.

    • Jim L

      Salaries have been pretty flat. You have to wonder where all the money/cash is going. Taxes haven’t gone down and prices have gone up. Where the inflation in pricing and stagnation in salaries get hidden is in loans. We now have 72, 84 and even 96 month loans for vehicles. No matter what one says RE inflation that prices are comparable, I would say rubbish. In my dads day when I was a kid, a single income home could be bought with a 15-20 years mortgage on average and cars on a 24 month loan. Now we need two incomes to just get by and loans have been pushed out. Mortgages tend to be 30 years and in some cases 40. We also see reverse mortgages now. Something ain’t right and we’re slowly getting hosed into indentured servitude to institutions that lend us money. With any situation like this, always ask, Cui bono?

      • HazardtoMyself

        Salaries are flat in some industries, but people today spend their money in places that didn’t exist before.

        Cable TV, streaming services, cell phones, internet, and others. Just add up these few though and some are paying upwards of $500 a month for these new necessities. Add in $5 a day Starbucks habit and more dining out than in the past and boom there is money for multiple motorcycles or maybe even something more drastic like savings.

        Homes seem to be bigger to. Old days family might have five kids in a 2 bedroom modest home. Today we have 1-2 kids in a 5 bedroom 3000+ sqft mini mansion.

        I hear kids in my workplace complain all the time how broke they are making $35 -$50k a year while still living at home with mom and dad. I wonder where is the money going?

        This of course is not everyone, but as a society we seems to have a money management problem.

        • Jim L

          all you have to do is look at the congress to see spending in action.

        • Jason

          Very true. Today the median new home is 2422 square feet while 40 years ago it was 1610 sq ft.

          Where I grew up the average home was a 1000 sq ft 3 bedroom / 1 bath. The parents got a room and kids shared by gender.

  • Walter

    Here’s the short version of your story…

    A lot of companies are essentially forcing employees to race to the bottom under the guise of digital freedom.

    • john burns

      that’s too short to be a Column.

      • Walter

        Well, I was on my way out the door to go for a ride 🙂

  • Tinwoods

    Weird how most of the comments here have nothing to do with the topic of the article. So, on the topic of the article, I work with many millennials (I’m a Boomer), and every single one of them has no interest in motorcycling, not because they can’t afford a motorcycle or because they’re too busy working, but because they just have no interest in motorcycles. Most don’t even have any interest in automobiles either. But if you want to talk about the latest iPhone or Android, they’re all in.