Yesterday, in the Tampa area, a road rage incident went off the hook as the driver of the car in the video below rammed his car into a motorcyclist and his passenger, knocking them off their Harley-Davidson. Once they were on the ground, the driver proceeded to run over the bike before fleeing the scene. Fortunately, both rider and passenger appear to be OK in the video. The same can’t be said for their motorcycle.

According to local news reports, the driver was apprehended by Florida Highway Patrol. Robert Vance, the alleged driver, has a history of run-ins with the law including other incidents of hit and run. Vance is currently detained at the Pasco County Jail, awaiting trial for three felony charges: aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, leaving the scene of a crash involving injury and operating a motor vehicle without a valid driver’s license (habitual offender).

Robert Vance Charges

The charges against Robert Vance who is being held in the Pasco County Jail in Florida.

A video of the altercation is below:

  • Buzz

    The A-hole should be fried. However, I always remind myself when I’m riding to never pick a fight with a 4000 lb car. Even a 100 lb soccer mom can kick your ass easily.

    • Ser Samsquamsh

      Be an ambassador!

      • Scott Silvers

        gotta watch out for the ‘ass’ embedded in the word ‘ambassador’.

  • cgw_niu

    Would love to see what was going on before the incident. What caused the driver to snap? Either way, hope he rots in jail

  • John Barba

    Looks like the rider was pulling something from the back of his pants, pistol?

    • sgray44444

      Good question… I have another one:
      What if the rider had pulled a piston and fired at the driver? Would it be considered justifiable? I think most likely not, however it’s probably a situation that is going to happen at some point with all the aggression on the road and all the concealed carry holders. The driver’s actions could be perceived as attempted murder.

      • spiff

        Would not be justified because the moment of danger was over, and the driver was leaving.

        • FreelancerMG

          It all depends on the justification of the mental state of the person using lethal force. If he could convince the DA or a grand jury that the guy could have backed up to finish the job it could be seen as justifiable self defense. There are cases out there where hit and run drivers have back up over their victim again and ran them over multiple times before driving off. I think there was a case of a guy losing his leg because of some dude following him into a turn out, running him over, back up over him, and running him over again on the way out. Some people when they make that mental call to murder someone, want to make sure the job gets done.

          • sgray44444

            He would have to prove that he was in mortal danger with no possibility of retreat. At least that’s what I was taught in my concealed carry class. I guess it is possible, but the circumstances would have to be right.

          • Jason

            I believe the bar is much lower in Florida, the land of Stand Your Ground, etc.

          • FreelancerMG

            It’s state dependent but some states, surprisingly CA is one of them, don’t require someone to flee prior to self defense. Generally called stand your ground laws. Although it could be said that having a bike on top of you with a car on top of that could preclude one from fleeing should your leg be pinned.

    • g8rb885

      Nah, he was using both hands pulling those jeans back up. Glad he was able to though.

    • DickRuble

      His thong was riding too high..

    • Scott Silvers

      That’s what I thought too! Then again, perhaps he was very shy about his plumber’s smile?

  • http://www.mymotorrad.com/ james lagnese

    Can’t wait for the 1%ers in jail to find out what this guy did. It’ll be booty call.

  • Rudy Hitchcock

    The Harley asshole should wait until he doesn’t have a woman on the back to act the ass. That’s why I don’t ride with HD owners anymore, they can be morons. I stick with the adventure tourer and sports tourer riders now.

    • Old MOron

      I haven’t seen the video, but I agree about being responsible for your passenger.

    • spiff

      Yeah… are you serious or trolling?

    • Scott Silvers

      Don’t talk about his property rights like that!

  • Vrooom

    Holy crap. And he doesn’t have a license, what a surprise. Hope he’s in jail for years, decades. They won’t be easy on him there.

  • Born to Ride

    I’d like to point out that the massive crash bars that cruiser riders like to bolt on their bikes likely saved that rider’s right leg from being crushed under the weight of that car and bike. I usually laugh at those things whenever I see them, but if you have a propensity for road rage and taking on cagers at stoplight brawls, better to have all the protection you can get.

    • DickRuble

      you could build crash bars all around.. problem is.. with all the safety gear plus crash bars .. it gets to a point where it’s faster to get in your car and drive.

  • John B.

    This guy has several felony convictions and two trips to state prison. Counterintuitively, a free society like ours will have more, not fewer, prisoners. In Saudi Arabia for example, death penalty offences include, among other offenses, sodomy, robbery, theft (4th conviction), adultery, burglary, terrorism, fornication, drug trafficking, atheism, blasphemy, waging war on God, and witchcraft. (That alone could substantially cull the MOron herd.) As such, in countries like Indonesia, China, and Saudi Arabia, Robert Paul Vance would either behave, or face the firing squad (Stoning in Saudi) and be done with. Not surprisingly, the crime and incarceration rates are comparatively low in these countries compared to the USA, but personal liberty suffers. Very likely Vance suffers from mental illness and/or addiction, and until our society figures out a way to treat the afflicted, Vance and others like him will spend their lives in and out of prison.

    • http://www.mymotorrad.com/ james lagnese

      I’ll pass on living in those places. I might fart at the wrong time and place and get stoned or lashed.

    • Old MOron

      Hmm, a free society like ours? The key words there seem to be “like ours”.
      According to wikipedia, places like the Scandinavian countries, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Spain, Belgium, France, seemingly much of Europe, plus Australia and Canada have lower incarceration rates than Saudi Arabia.

      • DickRuble

        not to mention most have free healthcare , free education, better retirement, and virtually no shootings (apparently our second amendment leaves them cold) ..

        • John B.

          The personal income tax rate in Sweden is 57% and an overall individual tax burden considerably higher. “Free” you say? That’s dope. Oh, and when the Russians march into Finland again, which they have done many times, the Fins will roll over and learn to speak Russian. Afterall, what choice do they have? It’s a veritable bastion of freedom up there! Skoal!!!

          • Old MOron

            I did not intend to start a political thread about one society versus another. You seemed to posit that high incarceration rates are a necessary effect of a free society, and I wanted to offer some counter examples.

          • John B.

            My premise is mathematical and simple. If a country such as Indonesia executes people for drug trafficking, and the U.S. merely incarcerates traffickers after a couple convictions, which country would you expect to have a higher incarceration rate? Hint: Once executed, a person doesn’t remain incarcerated.

          • Old MOron

            Let’s not prop up Indonesia as a straw man. Your premise may be mathematical, but it is not simple. I don’t think it’s correct to say that our glaringly high prison rates are a byproduct of freedom.

          • John B.

            The incarceration rate in the United States is too low. Mr. Vance is but one example. Please don’t leave us hanging. Tell us what accounts for the incarceration rate in the United States. And, how would anyone know the incarceration rate in places like China?

          • Old MOron

            Not knowing things like the true incarceration rate in places like China, nor their execution rate, is part of what makes your mathematical premise a complex one. As for accounting for the incarceration rate here at home, I think it has more to do with our “war on drugs” and our for-profit prisons than it has to do with being a free society.

            But you’ve made an interesting (if somewhat shocking) assertion. The US incarceration rates are too low? They’re about six or seven HUNDRED times higher than the rest of the western world, but they’re too low?

          • John B.

            I could give you a thousand examples, but let’s start with one:

            Last summer, I got a 21 year old kid deferred adjudication on two aggravated robbery cases including one where his victim was put in a medically induced coma for 15 days to save his life (doctors removed the victim’s skull and put it in a freezer until brain swelling subsided). The victim and the defendant were in the pharmesuetical business. My client is about 6’2″ 210 pounds with no discernible body fat, and he knows how to fight.

            My client told me he has a bad temper, and “that’s” how most of his fights go (i.e., really bad for the victim). Other people in the pharmesuetical business who witnesses the crime recorded the incident on their mobile phones and posted the video on Facebook.

            My client’s other aggravated robbery involved a scam he and his brother allegedly ran regularly with two prostitutes. The “ladies” lured a guy into a hotel room, where my client and his brother gave him a beating and stole his money and his watch.

            The DA’s initial offer was 30 years to do, but eventually, he had “witness problems,” and agreed to give my client deferred adjudication. My client is on the streets now. So is his brother. A county program landed him a job delivering home furniture!!! (How would you like to be the poor guy who complains when my client bumps into a wall with a piece of furniture.) This happens a thousand times a day in urban areas all over America. Think about that for a second.

            One difference between my client and you is he’s willing to beat you to death. One thing you have in common is neither of you is incarcerated. Our criminal justice system has many flaws, but over-incarceration is utter nonsense. If you don’t believe me spend a couple mornings in an urban courthouse and see for yourself who goes to jail and who returns to the streets. In the meantime, let me know if you need any furniture moved. I’ll hook you up.

          • DickRuble

            I never thought I would agree with you, and yet I do, on two counts: 1) The US judicial system is S**T (you just proved it). 2) Far more Americans belong behind bars than the entire prison system can handle.

          • Old MOron

            Hmm, I agree with you regarding whom we should but behind bars. Let all the non-violent marijuana violators out, and put the violent guys in.

          • John B.

            It’s a myth that prisons are packed with offenders whose only crime is minor MJ possession. The non-violent drug kingpin is also mythical. I reiterate, the American criminal justice system has many flaws, but overincarceration is not one of them.

            Collin County Texas has a Mental Health Managed Counsel program, which identifies mentally ill defendants at the outset, and gets them the mental healthcare and legal representation they need. This program ends the cycle of incarceration for thousands of mentally ill defendants. This is a great place to start in reforming our criminal justice system.

            http://tinyurl.com/zgk2swf

          • Old MOron

            I’m not in the trenches, like you. But wikipedia references increased sentencing laws, drug sentencing laws, and for-profit prisons as major causes for the US’s wildly disproportionate prison population.

            But let’s get back to the genesis for this thread. You said, “Counterintuitively, a free society like ours will have more, not fewer, prisoners. In Saudi Arabia for example, death penalty offences include, among other offenses, sodomy, robbery, theft (4th conviction), adultery, burglary, terrorism, fornication, drug trafficking, atheism, blasphemy, waging war on God, and witchcraft.”

            I pointed out that “society like ours” is right, because there are lots of free societies that have lower incarceration rates than Saudi Arabia. So maybe we really agree on this point.

            On a related front, you want more people in jail, and I want fewer. We can find some common ground by looking at violent versus non-violent offenders, but ultimately I guess we’ll just have to disagree on this one.

          • John B.

            Do you want people like my client and his brother in prison or do you want them on the streets? If you want them in prison then we need to put many more people behind bars. If you want them on the streets then we should expect more incidents like the one referenced in this article.

            I again urge you to visit a criminal courtroom in an urban area. You might learn something useful. Otherwise, what does Wikipedia say about brain plasticity?

          • Ser Samsquamsh

            Confused: are you bemoaning your violent, mentally-unstable, habitual offender client getting out of punishment on a technicality but – you are responsible for it?

          • John B.

            I’m bemoaning intelligent people believing we have an overincarceration problem in the U.S. simply because they read it on Wikipedia, or heard some politician say so. It’s so easy to get away with crime (violent and nonviolent) in the U.S. Even easier, if you have half a brain and/or competent counsel.

            My client did not get out on a technicality. I know how the system works, and I devised a strategy that worked well. When I take a criminal case it’s not my job to make sure violent criminals go to jail. My job is to give the Defendant an effective defense without violating the ethical rules.

            I accept criminal cases, in part, because I get a kick out of pounding government attorneys. It’s not really a fair fight. Urban Assistant District Attorneys and investigators have big caseloads filled with horrific crimes. I trimmed my caseload the last several years and have more time to think about my cases.

          • Ser Samsquamsh

            Maybe if you want more violent criminals in jail you should join the other team?

            Although it seems pretty thoroughly documented that the USA has the highest incarceration rate in the world per capita.

          • John B.

            The story above deals with a habitual offender who intentionally ran over a motorcyclist, and what bothers you is too many people are incarcerated in America. Got it!

          • Ser Samsquamsh

            Thanks for the clarification but I didn’t say it bothered me or not. There are assholes at large – got it. You repeatedly brought up the “myth of incarceration”. I am still not sure how that has relevance to this case in which someone picked the wrong fight. Don’t walk up to a buffalo and slap its nose either.

            If you were at a supermarket and had a smaller basket would you push your way in front of someone with a big cart and then give them the finger? That’s bad manners and you would also risk a 9mm to the eyeball.

            Click bait article- come on guys.

          • sgray44444

            I’d say the incarceration rates are too high, but the rate of capital punishment is too low. I don’t believe in prison for drug crimes: users should go to forced rehab, and dealers should be executed. That alone would thin the population drastically.

          • John B.

            California has been very busy freeing violent felons. It’s scarey. http://tinyurl.com/j6gyufu

          • Ser Samsquamsh

            Income tax is certainly higher in Canada and the Nordics but the exorbitant cost of insurance and education in the USA compensates.

            The Poles and Finns have been fighting the Russians for centuries. Your flip comments are not fair.

      • FreelancerMG

        And lost a huge portion of their personal freedoms that we take advantage of in the U.S. on a daily basis. It was getting to the point that when we were over there, they were telling us what type of cookware we could have. Handouts =/= freedom and liberty.

        • Kenneth

          “And lost a huge portion of their personal freedoms that we take advantage of in the U.S. on a daily basis”

          I may be wrong, but I really don’t think there are many northern Europeans/Scandinavians (or even Canadians), these days, who are dying to live in the U.S., taxes-be-damned (unless they are already wealthy).

          • DickRuble

            I know many iIalians, French, a few Spaniards, mucho Mexicanos who live here, never met a Dutch or a Swede… actually I know one Swede… he’s doing a Postdoc.

        • DickRuble

          Tell us what essential liberties you enjoy that the Swedes don’t.

          • FreelancerMG

            Just taking Sweden as the example then, I enjoy the fact that I don’t get taxed nearly as heavily on not only from income but they also have a pretty stiff tax rate on food as well. Even though their wages are close to our own and even exceed ours in some cases for the job, they lose a huge portion of that through taxes throughout nearly everything they do. I also enjoy the fact that I have a right to self defense. They kind of have that right until you actually examine the law and find that using any deadly weapon to defend your own life, even if you are outnumbered by a knife mob, will more than likely land you in prison. There’s also the whole proportionality crux that they use which isn’t generally an issue in many states that have fairly good self defense laws. In Sweden, if someone pointed a gun in your face or stabbed you and took your wallet, you’d go to prison if you then go Jason Bourne on their ass and end up killing them. In most US states, the focus in on the action of the robbery itself while in Sweden the focus is more on what the purpose of the action was about. If it’s property motivated, aka armed robbery or mugging, self-defense that sees the robber dead at the end will more than likely land you in prison.

            Overall though, I’ve known a few Swedes that love it here when they get here just for the economic freedom alone. They usually say that many Swedes are usually intimidated by our much more extroverted culture and sprawling communities.

          • Ser Samsquamsh

            As a US citizen how much do you expect to pay for education, insurance and health care? Trick question- if you are lucky to be well employed – nothing. If you aren’t, you’ll die early in prison or of diabetes. Freedom!

            The murder rate in Sweden is a tiny fraction that of the USA.

        • Scott Silvers

          Lost? You can’t lose what you never really had. Rights ain’t rights if they can be taken away – just ask the thousands of Japanese Americans who’s constitutional rights were suspended in order to incarcerate them during WW2. Rights are an illusion, and only work when they’re to your benefit.

      • Hot Stuff

        The cultures in those countries you mentioned are vastly different than ours. What works there can likely not be replicated here

        • Old MOron

          You’re probably right, Hot Stuff. I just wanted to point out that high incarceration rates are not unavoidable in a free society.

          • DickRuble

            Well.. but if you don’t wander around reciting the first lines of the second amendment, are you really free?

          • Ser Samsquamsh

            Shivering in a bunker full of muskets, praying the Chem-trails don’t get you is a God given right. How dare you?

        • Kenneth

          “What works there can likely not be replicated here”
          Powerful forces here (war profiteers, pharmaceutical companies, for-profit prisons, etc.) will do all they can to make sure it isn’t.

      • Scott Silvers

        You guys just ran over this whole thread with your world-knowledge factoid war…….

  • therr850

    All of you blaming the biker, the car was said to have been weaving through traffic wrecklessly when the bikes, more than one, pulled up in the right lane. The car driver yelled something explicit at the biker. He said something equally explicit back and the car driver cut the wheel and stepped on the gas. The car driver was already over the edge and the biker was an easy target.

  • JMDonald

    Putting this guy in jail is not enough. Caning. Ten whacks. One year hard labor. Restitution at 150% the value of the bike. Twenty five thousand dollar fine to be paid to each of the riders. I was a victim of bad customer service at a local retail establishment today. As much as I wanted to run the employs down, I maintained my composure and went home without incident.

    • cgw_niu

      I’m betting there are bikers in the prison he’s heading to that will teach him proper driving and respect.

    • Scott Silvers

      Should give this guy a fleet of Semi Trucks, and let him drive in Iraq….

  • http://motomuso.wordpress.com motomuso

    Bye-bye Bobby boy.

  • DickRuble

    Those Harleys are real eyesores.. Blinded the driver temporarily…

  • Patriot159

    Unfortunately I’ve lost faith in our court system to punish this jerk appropriately. I fear he’ll be out driving around again in months. Maybe a biker gang can ‘keep tabs’ on him if that happens (know what I’m sayin’?).

  • John B.

    The charges against the driver were upgraded to attempted murder. http://tinyurl.com/joykphp

  • allworld

    “habitual offender” Time to put this one in jail, for a very long time.