Church Of MO – 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview

Share this Article

Generally speaking, three-wheelers don’t get a favorable reception from you, our MO readers. That being said, check this out. After digging in the vaults just six years, we bring you our 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview from 2009. While many would call it blasphemy to convert a KTM 690 Supermoto into a trike, we think you’ll agree this is one cool three-wheeler. It leans into turns like the Piaggio MP3, but a flick of the wrist will also kick out the rear – something we’ve always wanted to do with a Can-Am Spyder. For this week’s Church of MO feature, check out what our European contributor, Tor Sagen, had to say about it from his 2008 preview.

2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview

Lean On Me

Although the Brudeli Leanster 654L is structurally based on the KTM 690 Supermoto, it resembles little else on this earth. It will be revealed next week at the Intermot show in Cologne, Germany, but the story of the Leanster goes back quite a ways.

DPP07D80602163433

A prototype known as the Brudeli 625L was first shown at EICMA in Milano back in November 2005 after a number of years in production. The inspiration for the 625L, which was based on a Polaris Trail Blazer ATV, came over ten years ago when inventor Geir Brudeli witnessed an old Swedish army motorbike that utilized skis up front in order to navigate the icy winter terrain.

Brudeli says the KTM-powered Leanster is at home on the local dirt track oval.

Brudeli says the KTM-powered Leanster is at home on the local dirt track oval.

The 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L is something quite out of the ordinary and has been created in a manner that accommodates leaning 45 degrees, which is five degrees more than Piaggio’s MP3 scooter. The Brudeli Leanster is no scooter though as it’s been made to lean, wheelie and stop just like a motorcycle – with the addition of one more front wheel!

Brudeli essentially pioneered this field as the Leanster was launched long before the Piaggio MP3 or Harley-Davidson Tri-Glide. The Leanster is powered by a 654cc four-stroke single cylinder powerplant supplied by KTM, as is much of the Leanster.

The high performing single produces 63 horsepower @ 7,000rpm and 48 ft-lbs of torque @ 6,550rpm. The dry weight is a claimed 525 lbs resulting in a claimed top speed of 104mph. Although it may not be the fastest bike around, it sure can be fun according to the inventor and manager of Brudeli Tech., Geir Brudeli.

“Making a 100 meter controlled powerslide at the local dirt track oval is quite an unbeatable feeling, especially when this is a street legal vehicle you actually rode to the track.” says Brudeli. “Then just a few minutes later you could be at a go-kart track without any change at the setup, leaning 45 degrees into corners with a control superior to a normal motorcycle.”

The Leanster suspension is 100% mechanical, leaving the rider in control of an experience unlike any other. The chassis is comprised of a tubular steel frame. Taking a closer look at those two front wheels that make this bike so special, you notice the massive 325mm brake discs with an inside out design and ISR calipers. The tires are 120/70/17 at the front and a 160/60/17 at the back.

DPP07D805170C0B48

The design of the new model has been executed by Atle Stubberud of ‘Soon Design’. Atle Stubberud was also the key designer for the concept model from 2005. Some designers would be intimidated to work on such a project, but Stubberud enjoyed the process a great deal.

“This really was a dream project for a transportation designer, it was similar to a student project where you could start with a really open mind,” says Stubberud.

Brudeli admits that he is looking for potential representation in the US as well as throughout Europe. He plans on having his company serve the market single-handedly but is considering possible dealership solutions. As opposed to the other more docile three-wheeled options, Brudeli is looking to target the true enthusiast – one who isn’t afraid to lean down 45 degrees and get their knees a little dirty.

Get Motorcycle.com in your Inbox
  • Luckey

    This thing would be more fun than any other bike. It would be a new class of recreational vehicles. I want one so bad.

  • DickRuble

    Doesn’t seem like this project went anywhere. Much more interesting than other three-wheel toys, at comparable price.

  • edbob

    This is the way all motorcycles should be built, and as it becomes cost/weight effective and even more safe the current two wheel design will eventually no longer exist except in museums or for stylistic purposes. With new laser collision avoidance technology cheaply available in every car, and when it becomes mandatory like ABS brakes etc, we will see a motorcycle and small car explosion due to the extra safety factor that meets the needs of the average person, and not just the current crop of risk takers that now ride. Motorcycles are cheap, fun, and practical – when they’re finally as safe a bet as a car designers like this guy will be at the ground floor of an economical and social revolution.

    • VeganLondonMan

      I hope the dystopia you’ve described never comes to fruition

      • edbob

        The above contraption looks like just as much, if not more fun than a regular motorcycle but with more stability and safety margin built in (better braking, cornering limits, responsiveness, etc. with two fronts.) That’s a win-win. Cars that hit the brakes for you if somebody gets in the way, or in your blind spot, or if you are turning left and don’t see the motorcycle approaching in the oncoming lane are also a win-win. The technology is now and is available not just in luxury cars but even in the least expensive models across the board. This makes it safer for us riders. Once safety isn’t as much of a compromise, we’ll have much more people in the motorcycle fold. In the real world, more motorcycles means more political clout, lower prices, more selection. Another win-win.

    • Stickyfrog

      The biggest problem is its width. While filtering and lane splitting is illegal in mos t of the US, it is a common practice in California and the rest of the world. This will make this model unattractive in some of the biggest motorcycle and scooter markets in the world where being able to filter through traffic is one of the biggest reasons many choose PTW’s to commute.

      • edbob

        Oooo…. good point. How about a variable width front that when vertical is no wider than the handlebars, and when you lean they spread out and tilt for stability

        • Stickyfrog

          I ride a Piaggio MP3 500. The wheels are close together and it leans beautifully. You can also lock the front when stationary negating the necessity of using the center stand. No real need for the wheels to be so far apart.

          • Jason

            The increased track allows the Brudeli to lean farther than the Piaggio increasing the maximum cornering forces. Whether that is necessary or not depends on the application but there is a reason for the increased track.

  • Jason

    I love these types of bikes. Leans like a motorcycle but doesn’t lowside. The best of both worlds. To bad we can only buy scooter versions.

    • Stickyfrog

      It can easily low side. The outside wheel in a turn will just come up off the ground.

      • Jason

        I’ve ridden a Piaggio MP3. The dealer said not to worry, i couldn’t low-side it if I tried. I tried by cornering through gravel and intentionally hitting the brakes. The bike slide through the gravel and then regained traction on the other side and continued on.

        That was with a vehicle with a narrow track designed to split lanes. A vehicle like the brudeli with a wide track would be next to impossible to low-side.

  • moldor

    If CanAm did this to the Spyder they wouldn’t be such a joke.

  • Kevin

    Manufacturers take note, this is the way to bring new and younger riders to your marque!

  • Stickyfrog

    The biggest problem is its width. While filtering and lane splitting is illegal in mos t of the US, it is a common practice in California and the rest of the world. This will make this model unattractive in some of the biggest motorcycle and scooter markets in the world where being able to filter through traffic is one of the biggest reasons many choose PTW’s to commute