One of the most storied names in motorcycling, BSA, has been purchased by Mahindra and Mahindra Ltd., the Indian automotive conglomerate that’s one of the biggest of its kind in the world. Mahindra purchased all 120,000 shares of the company at $34.63 per share, equalling roughly $4.2 million USD. Mahindra subsidiary Classic Legends (CLPL) acquired the brand, giving Mahindra full licensing rights and the rights to sell, market, and distribute BSA motorcycles on a global scale.

Powered by a 106cc Single, Mahindra's Centuro is its largest motorcycle offering.

Powered by a 106cc Single, Mahindra’s Centuro is its largest motorcycle offering.

We’ve yet to see what Mahindra’s plans are for the BSA brand, but it’s known the Indian company was looking to purchase an iconic British name – either Norton or BSA. When Norton CEO Stuart Garner said he wasn’t interested in selling his brand, attention shifted to BSA.

The Centuro, however, is not Mahindra's largest offering, at least when it comes to engine displacement. That honor belongs to the Gusto 125 scooter, powered by, yes, a 125cc Single.

The Centuro, however, is not Mahindra’s largest offering, at least when it comes to engine displacement. That honor belongs to the Gusto 125 scooter, powered by, yes, a 125cc Single.

The British motorcycle marque BSA was once one of the largest motorcycle manufacturers in the world before its business declined and operations ceased in 1972 due to increased competition from Japan and decreased resources being put into the company. Meanwhile, Mahindra has been on a shopping spree. In 2014 the company purchased a 51% stake in Peugeot Motocycles (PMTC) and acquired a 76.06% controlling stake in famed Italian design house Pininfarina for $28 million. Mahindra absorbed the Indian scooter maker Kinetic and formed a joint venture with Taiwanese brand SYM in an attempt to fight with established players like Hero MotoCorp, Honda, and Bajaj in the highly competitive (and lucrative) small-displacement category in the Asian market.

Considering the history of the BSA brand, it could be reasonable to guess the revamped company could return to producing modern versions of its classic motorcycles to rival the Triumph Bonneville or even Royal Enfield, another British marque with Indian ownership. Time will tell what comes next. Keep it on Motorcycle.com for the latest in the BSA saga.

 

  • Starmag

    Bring back the chrome gas tanks and sun badges or don’t bother. That was the best part of BSA. The worst part was the rods that flew through the cases.

  • Old MOron

    So Mahindra owns Sym, huh? I guy at work has one just like this. Looks like a fine little surface street commuter, although it would get stiff competition from Vespa in my view.

    http://www.alliancepowersports.com/images/models/Wolf/Gallery_Wolf_18.jpg

  • Larry Kahn

    Pay over $4million for the BSA name? Am I missing something? Tax write-off maybe?

  • JMDonald

    Let the games begin. They make a good tractor.

  • James Edward Zeiser

    An Indian BSA and an Indian Enfield. There has to be some irony that a Colony can make a brand work isn’t there?