Indian Motorcycle Displays New Accessories And Apparel

The Indian crew solidifies dealership design and supporting products

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The relaunch of Indian Motorcycle has been the biggest news to hit the cruiser market in many years. Under the stewardship of Polaris Industries, Indian is now well-capitalized for the first time in more than 60 years. Sales of the three-model Chief lineup have been meeting projections, and the Chief platform has received widespread critical acclaim.

But there’s more to relaunching a brand than simply producing good motorcycles. Indian has been busy, launching not only its new line of Chiefs in 2013, but also a new network of dealers and accessory and apparel lines.

2014 Indian Chief - Reinventing An Icon

Indian had just 13 active dealers at the beginning of 2013, stalwarts from the Kings Mountain era of production. By the end of the year, 70 dealers were retailing the new Chief lineup, and there are 70 more dealers which are set to come on line.

Indian Motorcycle of Orange County is one of the brand’s newest dealers, and the moto press was invited to the store to check out its decor and to see a sampling of Indian apparel and accessories.

A so-called Media Hearth will grace new Indian dealerships as an integral part of the decor.

A so-called Media Hearth will grace new Indian dealerships as an integral part of the decor.

Indian of OC has been open for two months and replaces a Harley-Davidson dealer from the same location. The interior design is clean and classy, and it’s a template for Indian’s new dealers, incuding fixtures, signage, furniture and flooring. Indian’s PR rep, Robert Pandya, describes it as “homey and casual.”

On the showroom floor were fully accessorized examples of each Chief model: the basic Classic; the bagged and windshielded Vintage; and the high-zoot faired Chieftain. Here are a few highlights.

Rewind: 2014 Indian Chief, Chief Classic, and Chieftain Review

The Classic is the bare-bones Chief, but the fork includes bracketry for the Vintage model’s windshield, so adding a screen to a Classic couldn’t be simpler. The accessorized version we saw was fitted with components designed to accommodate shorter riders. A handlebar ($199.99) pulled back two inches and a heated seat ($599.99) that places a rider one inch forward and one inch lower significantly reduces the gangly layout of the stock rider triangle.

These bar-mount speakers ($599.99) can be wired to a music player or connected via Bluetooth. Indian rep Mark Boswell says music can be heard up to 75 mph without a windshield.

These bar-mount speakers ($599.99) can be wired to a music player or connected via Bluetooth. Indian rep Mark Boswell says music can be heard up to 75 mph without a windshield.

The Chief Vintage already includes saddlebags and a windshield, but there are plenty of accessories available to further personalize it.

This Chief Vintage is fitted with Indian's Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust ($699.99) which also includes an ECU reflash to suit the freer-flowing pipes. Floorboard decoration will please fringe fetishists.

This Chief Vintage is fitted with Indian’s Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust ($699.99) which also includes an ECU reflash to suit the freer-flowing pipes. Floorboard decoration will please fringe fetishists.

The Chieftain sits at the top of Indian’s line, boasting a fairing with an electrically adjustable windscreen and a 100-watt audio system.

This Chieftain is equipped with Concert Audio Lids ($399.99) and the Concert Saddlebag Audio Kit ($574.99). The kit's 100-watt amplifier cleverly fits under the saddle, so it's not stealing space from the bags.

This Chieftain is equipped with Concert Audio Lids ($399.99) and the Concert Saddlebag Audio Kit ($574.99). The kit’s 100-watt amplifier cleverly fits under the saddle, so it’s not stealing space from the bags.

Apparel

Indian tells us its apparel is developed in-house from scratch in the U.S. and UK under the direction of female designers. Indian seems to understand its market quite well, acknowloging that most of its customers are middle-aged and older. As such, they coined the phrase “V-Twin Fit,” a nice way of saying it fits older riders who likely have extra girth around their waists. Jackets are sold in sizes up to 5XL.

Indian's apparel and casual wear have been available for about a year. Indian tells us the gear is manufactured in Vietnam at an unnamed facility that's said to also produce apparel for premium brands like Alpinestars. Look for an updated apparel lineup to debut in August.

Indian’s apparel and casual wear have been available for about a year. Indian tells us the gear is manufactured in Vietnam at an unnamed facility that’s said to also produce apparel for premium brands like Alpinestars. Look for an updated apparel lineup to debut in August.

 

 

 

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  • DickRuble

    If this is what the editor in chief produces, what can you expect from the rank and file? Kevin Duke, is this all you can write about, your best effort?

    • http://www.themotorcycleobsession.com/ Chris Cope

      Don’t judge a man for enjoying a press junket. Plus, attending and writing about such events benefits MO in the long run as it helps keep companies friendly. That helps MO get a chance to test ride bikes, do long-term tests, etc.

      Meanwhile, those bar-mounted speakers for the Chief make my soul hurt. Stupid-looking thing is stupid.

      • DickRuble

        I don’t blame him for eating. Here’s what I would rather read about in a motorcycle magazine: Replacing a standard fork with an UD one, How to tune up an injection system to match an upgraded exhaust and carburetor, heck, maybe how to install a big bore kit or why swapping an old carburetor for a new, expensive one won’t make any meaningful difference to engine output absent other changes… You know… motorcycle stuff.. Is there still such a magazine anywhere?

        • Daniel Madigan

          Try reading “Baggers” they take everything apart.

          • DickRuble

            Thanks for the tip! They do indeed seem to have a few do-it-yourself projects.

    • TpottyTerror

      Sounds like you’re a jealous dude.

  • Kevin Duke

    I got invited to an event and ate some free food and got some info about Indian. I put all I was given into the story, all except for the delicious pork shoulder roast.

    • VeganLondonMan

      Well I enjoyed the article, but then I’m interested in buying a new fuel injected Indian and not swapping out some old carburetor… don’t pay no mind to the negativity; miserable commenter is miserable. Ha.

  • Mark D

    lol “v-twin fit.”

    • VeganLondonMan

      Ha. I’ve only ever ridden V-twins, and I’ve never needed a “V-twin fit”, but I suppose the stereotype holds.

      • DickRuble

        Sure you had a v-twin fit. It refers to the XXS helmets, also known as pin-head fit.

  • TonyCarlos

    How/why Polaris failed to adopt the original Indian’s spelling of “motocycles” is beyond my grasp. A minor shot at uniqueness would have helped them stand apart.
    Of course it would have caused a lot of misdirection when typing in web site addresses, but that could have been addressed electronically.

    • TpottyTerror

      Simple. Indian themselves made that change long ago. The bikes are already unique as is their history. Playing pedantic word games wouldn’t do anything but bring out 10 times as many negative comments as otherwise.